Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,914   Posts: 1,584,710   Online: 785
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    5,243
    Images
    9

    Lighting tutorial?

    Wanting to dabble in lighting a lot more than I have I realized quickly that I had no idea what I was doing. I am looking for good video explanations of lighting. The only option to watch someone work around here is a cookie cutter senior/family portrait person. I am looking for something a bit more varied. I have done a little looking on Youtube but there is a lot there, and I, not knowing what I am looking at, can't filter the bad from the good.

    You tube has been a godsend in my learning to use a metal lathe and wood turning once I was pointed to the folks to watch and was wondering if there is a youtube or other video source about lighting that I could watch.

    With things like lighting that are visual in nature books don't really do it for me. I need to see someone manipulate the lights not say figure A represents lighting for picture in figure B.

    Any suggestions?
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  2. #2
    Helinophoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Norway
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    591
    Images
    20
    Well, to swear in church, this is where the advantage of digital comes in to play, because you can test and test and test until you get it right, instantly.
    I learned to use my studio gear myself trough a couple of basic books, time, willing friends and trial and error.

    After a few years now. I know what to expect, but I still don't shoot studio photos with film unless I double-check everything with my 1ds MK II first, if the light or exposure is wrong, it's poop in - poop out and a waste of film, time and money.

    I've never really seen any great learning videos on studio lighting to be honest. There are many, but this is like cooking; You know what you want, you need to learn how to get there, sort of.

    The only really great and inspiring video I'v seen on studio-stuff is Thorsten Ott's tutorials on light and equipment.
    He provides schematics and explanations along the way and the final result is really something that makes you want to start shooting straight away.
    http://www.zeroplusplus.com/creative...ople-tutorial/
    I do think though, that if you've never really used studio lights before, even Thorstens video's can be a little more on the advanced side.

    Still highly reccomended! (here's a preview):

    http://vimeo.com/13505374

    I also have the DVD's from Dean Collins, but they are very technical and to be honest, I didn't get much benefit from them at the time I was viewing them, may be different now though.

    Also, buy a good book, for example this one (I own it myself):
    http://amzn.com/1584281251

    Study it and then check out Thorsten's video.
    Still, you need to practise, a lot, to get a good feel for how things work together and what kind of effect various modifiers make.
    Last edited by Helinophoto; 08-08-2012 at 05:10 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    -
    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
    Visit my photography blog at: http://helino-photo.blogspot.com

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    5,243
    Images
    9
    I've played with lighting, just never really liked what I got. I agree with the wonders of digital when it comes to playing. a 4 gig card means a lot of cheap play. I'll burn film when I like what I am getting. I was just looking a little more visual instruction. Thanks for the links.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  4. #4
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Beaverton, OR, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,796
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  5. #5
    CGW
    CGW is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,797
    What exactly are you trying to light?

  6. #6
    jp498's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Owls Head ME
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,467
    Images
    74
    Get some cheap lighting and a digital camera. Some brooding/work lamps with different wattage bulbs from the hardware store and play around. Reflectors made with tinfoil and foamcore. White gauze to diffuse light. It's not versatile like the purpose made stuff, but it's an efficient way to learn. There is essentially nothing new in artificial lighting. A DSLR is an easy to way test setups. If you want to start with strobes, get some monolights with modeling lamps. If you don't have modeling lamps, you won't be able to see what you're adjusting as you move the subject and lights around.

    For me, it's three things... 1. testing and trying things. 2. looking at highlights and shadows in photos to see where the lighting sources were and their relative strength. 3. understanding the inverse square law to understand the relationship between light-subject distance and brightness.

    There's also a website and phenomena called strobist. It's partly a gear whoring site for tinkerers, and partly an inspiration site for when photographers aren't feeling creative, sort of like you might head to allrecipes when you're hungry, but don't know what you want to cook. It won't turn you into an awesome photographer any more than allrecipies will make you a chef, but it shows some interesting possibilities.

    I'm told Charles Abel's book, "professional portrait lightings" has some of the documentation you are looking for, but it's too expensive for me to purchase. If you could borrow it from some library loan system, it might be worth checking out.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    5,243
    Images
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by CGW View Post
    What exactly are you trying to light?
    People and things
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  8. #8
    CGW
    CGW is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,797
    Quote Originally Posted by mark View Post
    People and things
    Try Strobist.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    5,243
    Images
    9
    The Buff site is pretty informative. I shall now look up Strobist.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  10. #10
    Terry Christian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Memphis, TN
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    598
    Images
    18
    This obviously isn't a substitute for an informative site, but the basic principles are:
    1. Set shutter speed at or below camera sync speed. How much below depends on how much ambient light you want to let in.
    2. Use light modifiers to shape the light from your flash the way you want it.
    3. Aperture determines flash exposure at a given ISO. Meter and use f-stop ratios, or just adjust the power settings on your flash(es) to taste to get the flash exposure correct.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin