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  1. #21
    rbarker's Avatar
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    While I agree that the light output of the strobes being used may influence film selection, I'd suggest selecting a film (and developer) that gives you the look you want, ignoring the fact that you're using strobes for lighting. For use with 35mm, that might be a slower, finer-grained film like Pan F+, or a medium-speed film like FP4+, or even one of the tabular-grained films like T-Max or Delta 100.

    The choice is really a matter of personal taste and style - something that only you can resolve through testing.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  2. #22
    bjorke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeGates
    I am *just* now setting up studio space (actually, two days ago), and am trying to learn my way around lighting.
    If you are familiar with a film (like TX), use that -- so that you can move forward PREDICTABLY. Using a new film when getting used to artificial lighting is to add unknown variables to the equation. Is your lighting creating hot spots and hard shadow areas, or is it this snappy new unknown film?

    Whatever you choose, stick with it until your comfort level is high or until you have some COMPELLING reason to switch (like the need for fine grain or color). Then do the same with the new film.

    If you have no other considerations, pick something with a lot of latitude, so that you don't bury yourself in blown highlights etc. I recommend Tri-X rated at 200 or 250 for that. Quite lovely stuff, really. Don't worry so much about uber-fine grain, go for tone -- Tri-X does well and is a flexible friend.

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
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