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  1. #11

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    I see now that I really only have two choices and the idea of using the dome for a reflected reading or dome off for an incident reading just DOESN'T MAKE SENSE!
    No, if you are making a statement, you're correct, this doesn't make sense.
    Just to be sure we're on the same page...you use the dome at the subject, for incident readings.
    You remove the dome when you are standing some distance away from the subject...for reflected readings.

    Also, a great trick for eliminating/reducing bright sky-light from skewing your reflected readings;
    hold your hand, hat or clipboard, a little above and slightly forward of the light meter.
    Think of...wearing a brimmed hat to shade your eyes from the sun. Same principle!

    Marc

  2. #12

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    If you want to make it easy, for a subject you can walk up to, use the dome and measure incident. Just make sure you are not creating your own shadow....

    To me, reflective mode with these are not that useful. Reflective mode measures light reflecting from your subject and hitting your meter. But.... without an ability to POINT to a certain spot of your subject, you have no idea what part of your subject you are measuring. Say you have a person with blond hair and white skin wearing dark gray suit. To make it more interesting, standing in front of a highly reflective pond. What now.... Yes, it can sort of measure average but how do you know the view of field of your meter is same as your lens?
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    I do not agree with Tom.

    Do not use the dome for a reflective reading, even though there are some at APUG that believe that is the thing to do. I have thoroughly researched that subject on the internet, at Kodak and at many photographic libraries. There are no articles or books that discuss that method. Period. When I talked to optical engineers, their response is that they would like to know what drugs the people who make such recommendations are on. Again, there is no accepted photographic journals nor any photographic books that discuss such blither. Take the blither of using the dome for reflective reading and flush it down the toilet.
    I did see someone on APUG said that.

  4. #14

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    Wow, awesome responses and super helpful. I am new to this community (and really shooting film) but I already love it here. Very friendly and eager to help folks. Thanks again, I really appreciate the help.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by sygyzy View Post
    Wow, awesome responses and super helpful. I am new to this community (and really shooting film) but I already love it here. Very friendly and eager to help folks. Thanks again, I really appreciate the help.

    Oh, you'll be right, mate. Mind you, there are a couple of bizarre posts here. For now, just go out and experiment and have fun and don't be too concerned with the pseudo-scientific and authoritarian views espoused on metering.

  6. #16

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    Geez, as a user of the pseudo scientific method of incident and pretty much non-authoritarian, I have to include myself amongst those who have NEVER heard anyone using a domed/Inverconed meter for reflected readings. Wonder what the Weston manual says about that?
    Check out reply #11 it's totally correct

    Anyway, Incident metering either at the subject or IN THE SAME LIGHT as the subject gives the same exposure. To meter the far side of the Grand Canyon, Hold the meter with the dome facing the lens, no need to fly across it.

    Reflected CAN be influenced by the reflectivity of your subject. IE:a dark subject will overexpose because the meter sees(interprets)
    the reading as a middle gray and want you to open the lens or use a slower shutter speed.
    Conversely a bright/light subject will under expose because the meter wants you to use a faster speed or smaller aperture.

    Obviously try either method and look at your results, then make your choice.
    Rather than starting out using several methods of metering, use the two simplest around, incident and reflected.
    Expletive Deleted!

  7. #17
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sygyzy View Post
    This has been super helpful, fellas. I see now that I really only have two choices and the idea of using the dome for a reflected reading or dome off for an incident reading just DOESN'T MAKE SENSE! I am not sure why I even thought they were valid choices. I feel much more confident now when I go out and shoot. I will try both and see which result in better lit photos. And of course I'll stick to reflected if I can't get near the subject.

    Are there any special situation or caveats I should be aware of, besides the ones mentioned already (ie don't point a reading too much toward the sky)
    You can learn the Zone System tones and typical subject matter, and when the scene is nearby you can explore by walking close to things and taking close-up reflected readings, and "place" the readings on their usual Zones.

    The first thing you can try is... meter the palm of your hand in the light with reflected light. "Place" it on Zone VI. (Open up one stop to give more exposure than meter reads). Logically, you know your hand is bright and if you were to use a bright reading as-is, you would underexpose the shot. So you open one stop when you meter your hand. Now switch to incident mode and take your reading normally pointing at the camera.

    If you did it right, the readings should agree - and this should boost your confidence.

    I've recently been using a Master II meter with Zone Sticker, and have been enjoying this technique of reflected light reading - without necessarily requiring a spotmeter. The digital interface of your meter isn't as easily adapted to Zone System stickers.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by sygyzy View Post
    When how do I know which to use and when? Some situations are helpful such as taking a picture from a subject too far to walk to (like a mountain). In that case, I am forced to use reflected mode (pointing toward subject, eye exposed). What would happen, though, if I was pointing the meter at the subject but had the eye covered by the lumisphere?


    If the mountain is being illuminated by the sun and you are being illuminated by the sun just orient yourself in a line that is parallel to the line from your camera to the Mountain and turn your back to the mountain and take a reading.

    I will often have some idea of how I will be oriented to take a shot and just orient myself that way and then turn around and take an incident meter reading and then hike off to where I'm going to take the shot. If you are shooting in the middle of the day and the light isn't changing much because of moving clouds or the sun rising and setting you can take a reading and then hike for fifteen minutes and then take your shot. That solves the shadow/distant subject issue a lot of the time.

    You have to understand what exactly it is you are metering. There is nothing magical about being close to the subject.

  9. #19
    Mark Feldstein's Avatar
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    Take a look at the Sekonic manual for this over here:
    http://www.sekonic.com/downloads/l-308s_english.pdf
    The quick start manual for the 308 S over here:
    http://www.sekonic.com/downloads/l-3...ck_english.pdf

    And for an excellent uncomplicated education on how to use a light meter, check this out:
    "The Hand Exposure Meter Book" by Martin Silverman, Jim Zuckerman and Bob Shell Published by the Photo Books Division of Mamiya America Corp. First Edition 1999. You can find it over here, among other places.
    http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_no...20Meter%20Book The same basic info applies today as it did in 1999. Only the meters have changed (to protect the manufacturers. ;>)
    Mark
    _________________________________
    Without guys like John Coltrane, Count Basie and Duke Ellington, life....would be meaningless.

  10. #20

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    Do what Mark suggests and READ the frickin' manual. Makes things much easier all the way around.

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