Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,908   Posts: 1,521,541   Online: 833
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. #1
    k.hendrik's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    260
    Images
    92

    better reading less or almost no light :)

    Hi,
    I would love to have better results in reading (very)low lights. Own a Sekonic L-398A and I'm not satisfied. Like to make portraits/still-life in low-available light.
    thanks.

  2. #2
    frank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Bit north of Toronto
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    515
    Images
    2
    My blog / photo website: http://frankfoto.jimdo.com/

  3. #3

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Aurora, IL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,936
    Checked the spec of the 398a. EV4 for incident and EV9 for reflected it's not sensitive in low light. A more sensitive meter might help.

  4. #4
    polyglot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    South Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,094
    Images
    12
    Definitely a more-sensitive meter is called for, e.g. a Pentax DSM will get you down to EV1 reliably. That's probably about as dark as most people would go when shooting portraits on film (EI1600, f/1.4, 1/15s = EV1).

    However if you're shooting at night (well below EV0) then there are basically NO instant-reading meters that will give you an accurate result. You need a meter with extremely high sensitivity, high quality large-aperture optics and the ability to integrate light over a duration of several seconds. It's called a "cheap DSLR" and they can be cheaper than a good spot-meter!

    Consider a night exposure I did recently; it called for ISO f/8 30 minutes, which is about EV-5. That's 6 stops less light than even a good spot-meter can reliably take a reading from, which makes it basically impossible to directly meter. However by setting my DSLR to f/1.4 ISO3200 and taking a few handheld test exposures (motion-smeared but who cares?), I discovered that 1.6s gave a decent result. Convert the change in aperture and ISO (multiply by 1024 in my case) and you get the meter reading that you want. Even better, you can look at the histogram on the screen and see that the distribution of tones is what you want to see, etc. Once I added a correction for reciprocity failure, I got a perfect exposure on a chrome. Pity my composition sucked

  5. #5
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    7,007
    Images
    223
    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    Definitely a more-sensitive meter is called for, e.g. a Pentax DSM will get you down to EV1 reliably. That's probably about as dark as most people would go when shooting portraits on film (EI1600, f/1.4, 1/15s = EV1).

    However if you're shooting at night (well below EV0) then there are basically NO instant-reading meters that will give you an accurate result. You need a meter with extremely high sensitivity, high quality large-aperture optics and the ability to integrate light over a duration of several seconds. It's called a "cheap DSLR" and they can be cheaper than a good spot-meter!

    Consider a night exposure I did recently; it called for ISO f/8 30 minutes, which is about EV-5. That's 6 stops less light than even a good spot-meter can reliably take a reading from, which makes it basically impossible to directly meter. However by setting my DSLR to f/1.4 ISO3200 and taking a few handheld test exposures (motion-smeared but who cares?), I discovered that 1.6s gave a decent result. Convert the change in aperture and ISO (multiply by 1024 in my case) and you get the meter reading that you want. Even better, you can look at the histogram on the screen and see that the distribution of tones is what you want to see, etc. Once I added a correction for reciprocity failure, I got a perfect exposure on a chrome. Pity my composition sucked
    My sekonic 758DR goes from EV1-EV24 so upgrade your sekonic?

    Also I agree sometimes you just have to use a "fancy Polaroid" to check


    ~Stone | Sent w/ iPhone using Tapatalk
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  6. #6
    Rudeofus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,553
    Images
    10
    EV 1 over EV4 gives you three stops, which is nice but let's be honest: it's not going to solve k.hendrick's problem. I, too, find it odd, that $500+ light meters have less range than smart phone cameras, it's not like we expect sharp high res images from light meters ...

    One note to k.hendrick: don't forget about reciprocity failure, even if a perfect light meter tells you "5 minutes exposure at F/4" this will most likely not give you good results.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Aurora, IL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,936
    Quote Originally Posted by Rudeofus View Post
    EV 1 over EV4 gives you three stops, which is nice but let's be honest: it's not going to solve k.hendrick's problem. I, too, find it odd, that $500+ light meters have less range than smart phone cameras, it's not like we expect sharp high res images from light meters ...

    One note to k.hendrick: don't forget about reciprocity failure, even if a perfect light meter tells you "5 minutes exposure at F/4" this will most likely not give you good results.
    Expensive light meter isn't all that sensitive although something like the sekonic 308 can measure to EV0 ISO 100. They are accurate and that's what needed. Portraiture at illumination less than EV0?? I doubt that.

  8. #8
    frank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Bit north of Toronto
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    515
    Images
    2
    From the link in my post:
    -5 EV

    Profisix Lunasix F Lunalite
    Type Null pointer hand held exposure meter
    Introduction 1977 1981
    Sensor SBC (Silicon Blue Cell)
    Measurement Ambient & Flash* Ambient
    Sensitivity -5 to +24 LV -1 to +17 LV +1 to +17 LV
    Display -3 to +3 EV Pointer 3 LED
    Film Speed ISO 0.8 to 100,000
    Aperture f 0.7 to f 128
    Time 1/4,000s to 8 hours
    Power 9v Battery
    Dimensions 120 x 44 x 70mm
    Weight 250g 195g 170g
    My blog / photo website: http://frankfoto.jimdo.com/

  9. #9
    k.hendrik's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    260
    Images
    92
    Thanks all ! as usually the solution is staring into my face: my D200 rather heavy but I start with this and after that maybe the Profisix.

  10. #10
    bsdunek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Michigan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,100
    Images
    192
    Quote Originally Posted by frank View Post
    I would second that. My old Lunasix will get a reading with my hand over the sensor when in regular daylight. They are very good for low light.
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak just did!


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin