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  1. #11
    jcc
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    Or maybe a slower film, like ISO 25, if you want to avoid filters.

  2. #12

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    These ND filter have my interest.. I have a polarizing filter, but the ND filters graded? if so.. How do you know where to stop it down at? Are there filter that have - 1 or 2 stop to get min depth of field? Using light meter with this too.


    Todd

  3. #13
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    High shutter speed flash syncing cameras is also another strategy. You can also move the flash closer also. But this will reduce the specularity of the light which you may or may not want.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToddB View Post
    These ND filter have my interest.. I have a polarizing filter, but the ND filters graded? if so.. How do you know where to stop it down at? Are there filter that have - 1 or 2 stop to get min depth of field? Using light meter with this too.


    Todd
    Graduated filters are only if you want a portion of your scene to gradually get darker the closer to the edge of the frame you get. Forget that.
    Use standard neutral density filters. They leave everything in the picture intact, and just make it darker. They exist in a range from two stop down to the 'big stopper' which I think is 10 stops. I normally use a 3 stop, which is useful on very bright days. I normally shoot 400 speed film, and if I want larger apertures, it's JUST right. I also use a 9 stop filter, which is great for making long exposures during the day.
    A polarizer affects the look of a scene by removing many of the reflections of shiny surfaces, so using it as an ND filter is a compromise if you don't want that effect.

    Other than that I don't know much about flash photography.

    Good luck!
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  5. #15

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    The problem with using a neutral density filter is that it will reduce the flash output as well. If you knock the ambient light down 2 stops with a ND, you will need to increase your flash output by two stops to achieve the same exposure.

    This might work while doing flash as fill (Flash is 1-2 stops below the ambient) but will be difficult to do if the flash is your key (Ambient is 1-2 stops below the flash) and will require a big Flash, like a studio flash.

    The best way to go is higher sync speed, the FE is 1/125 which is not really high enough. Newer bodies are 1/250 and leaf shutter cameras sync at all speeds, well up to 1/500 at least on mine.

    Another option is high speed sync which is available on the newer Nikon flashes and bodies, but again flash output diminishes as you go for higher sync speeds.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    ... But this will reduce the specularity of the light which you may or may not want.
    I'm not OP but can you explain this in a sentence or two? Pretend that I'm 5 years old...

  7. #17
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Specular light

    Quote Originally Posted by NedL View Post
    I'm not OP but can you explain this in a sentence or two? Pretend that I'm 5 years old...
    Please correct me if I'm wrong here. But the further away the light source such as the sun, the more specular, it is. The closer, the less specular. As mentioned earlier, the sun is very specular (harsh) because it's so far away. On the other hand, if a light source is closer, it will look softer, less specular.

    Maybe another APUGer can explain better than I can.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris G View Post
    The problem with using a neutral density filter is that it will reduce the flash output as well.
    I maybe daft but, this make no sense to me at all. How does putting an ND filter on the lens have any effect at all on the flash output? Are you assuming that the flash is getting exposure info from the camera's TTL metering system?

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradS View Post
    I maybe daft but, this make no sense to me at all. How does putting an ND filter on the lens have any effect at all on the flash output? Are you assuming that the flash is getting exposure info from the camera's TTL metering system?
    Relative flash output is I think what he was getting after. With 400 speed film, your flash's GN is 4x that vs. 100 speed film.

    Neutral Density filters or slower film, either will do. If you get the balance between flash and ambient correct at, say, f/8, a 3 stop ND filter will give you the same balance at f/2.8 without adjusting the shutter speed or flash power.
    New-ish convert to film.
    Pentax MX for 35mm
    Bronica ETRS for 645

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by fretlessdavis View Post
    Relative flash output is I think what he was getting after. With 400 speed film, your flash's GN is 4x that vs. 100 speed film.
    Yes, thank you... the actual output of the flash doesn't change

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