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  1. #41
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaf-Photo View Post
    The OP suggested that he was shooting portraits, so there should be people around to hold the reflector. If not, stands are cheap.

    One more benefefit of the reflector is that it sculpts rather than flattens like a flash does - and you can see the lightingin the viewfinder, rather than wait until the film is developed.
    Flash can do a good job of sculpting the light too, just add a cord from hot shoe to flash or bounce the light. Flash is very flexible once learned.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  2. #42
    Jaf-Photo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    Flash can do a good job of sculpting the light too, just add a cord from hot shoe to flash or bounce the light. Flash is very flexible once learned.

    Sure, but when you shoot portraits of clients with film you won't know until after the shoot if you flattened their faces or gave them big noses (unless you use a polaroid back).

    Considering that and the syncing difficulties described above, I feel that a reflector would be superior for the OP's purposes.

    Which is why you see them a lot on pro shoots, I guess.
    Last edited by Jaf-Photo; 03-06-2014 at 09:31 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #43
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaf-Photo View Post
    Sure, but when you shoot portraits with film you won't know until after the shoot if you flattened their faces or gave them big noses (unless you use a polaroid back). considering that and the syncing difficulties described above, I feel that a reflector would be superior.

    Which is why you see them a lot on pro shoots, I guess.
    Reflectors are a good choice, no question there.

    Your choice to use them instead of flash is fine too, not asking you to do different.

    But:

    The syncing difficulties are very manageable and with a bit of practice a wonderful use for fill flash that can be done without assistance and in any direction. If you are working with a bright front lit background and a shaded subject reflectors become a real challenge because the sun is behind you and hidden from direct view.

    And:

    The flattening/big nose argument is silly unless one is truly new to portraits or simply not paying attention: it isn't an issue related to flash or reflector use.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #44
    Jaf-Photo's Avatar
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    Sure, there's no need to run this discussion much further.

    I just find that really accomplished use of flash is less widespread today than before.

    Probably because most shooters today are digital and can get away with not using flash in situations where in the old film days it was essential (now we have noiseless high iso and light sculpting in Lightroom etc).

    Based on the OP's questions, I assumed that my comments could be relevant.

  5. #45
    mweintraub's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    Because it takes a stand or second person to do well.

    It does work well though if you have the support.
    You can do it!

    /support

  6. #46
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mweintraub View Post
    You can do it!

    /support
    Big help!
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by mweintraub View Post
    I thought the shorter duration were at higher powers.

    added: I've experienced issues where my strobes were not illuminating the frame when I shot above 1/200 and no, it's not my camera's sync speed because I used it below the 1/250s on the digital and the 1/400 of the RZ67
    OK, so last night I set up some gear to finish off a roll I had in the RZ67. Focusing on the aperture, focus, and keeping the dog still, I unintentionally ignored what shutter speed I had the camera set on for the first shot. It was set at 1/400s. After that, I changed it to 1/60s. After processing the film I noticed that the frame shot at 1/500s is underexposed. I'll scan the film as examples.

  8. #48
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mweintraub View Post
    OK, so last night I set up some gear to finish off a roll I had in the RZ67. Focusing on the aperture, focus, and keeping the dog still, I unintentionally ignored what shutter speed I had the camera set on for the first shot. It was set at 1/400s. After that, I changed it to 1/60s. After processing the film I noticed that the frame shot at 1/500s is underexposed. I'll scan the film as examples.
    Was flash involved?

    Direct or bounce?

    Were there other light sources?

    What I'm getting at here is that the flash typically has it's greatest effect on the main subject and given that the flash is faster than the shutter, typically 1/1,000th or even much shorter than that, the shutter has no effect on that part of the light. Flash output is typically controlled by duration, 1/1,000th is typical of a full power pop, 1/4 power pop might be 1/8,000th, you get where this is going I'm sure. Full power pops are not normal with fill flash unless the distance is large.

    The shutter time does have a very big effect on the ambient light.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #49
    mweintraub's Avatar
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    Sorry, I was going to give the full details when I got the film scanned, but here it is.

    RZ67 on tripod with 110mm 2.8 on Kodak TMAX 100 (2010 expired, fridge stored)
    One Fotodiox L-600 strobe on min power (1/64?) with 24x36"(?) softbox about 3-5' from subject (I'm bad at gauging distances)
    Metered with L-358, ISO 100, 1/60s -> f/6.3
    Lens aperture set to f/5.6 (non W lens)

    edit to add: It was kinda dark in the room so I'm guessing ambient had no affect.

  10. #50
    MattKing's Avatar
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    The flash might have been of a duration that is too short - you may have experienced the "short duration" type of reciprocity failure.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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