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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by rbarker
    Lighting-kit choice is a question that faces everyone - except those who choose to shoot only with natural light. And, many have gone through several kits before arriving at something that works for them - essentially, wasting a lot of money along the way (even though the interim solutions seemed economical at the time of purchase).
    I have only limited space so a High output flash system won't be the ting for me Im sure. You may be right bout the money wast though. That I have experienced many times in my "Photographic carreer"

    Tungsten lights can be inexpensive, but tend not to be very practical for people work. Once you get enough light that enables you to shoot at reasonable exposures, the light is too intense for people to open their eyes, and their skin starts to darken, crack and peel. .
    Ouch, I can imagine the smell "who ordered pork roast ?"

    Thus, my suggestion would be really give some thought to what you shoot, and how you want to shoot it (e.g. at what apertures, with which light modifiers, etc.), before taking the plunge. Then, decide on a product line with which you can grow over time as the budget allows.
    I was thinking I would use "studioligths" for some Portraits, and pictures of my wife when her stomach gets bigger. Hopefully I'll be able to make some nudes too. for the time being I was thinking 1 or max 2 lights since I know I can't handle more at a time as a newbie. My first wish was a strobe at
    200-250 Ws with 4 stop stepless output regulator (or whatever it's called)
    The "hotlight" idea appeared because they are so cheap and if they can deliver enough light (is 150W enough ?) they coul be the answer.
    Since I'm planning on B&W only, lighttemp wont be a problem but I plan to use the daylight tubes anyway because they produce less heat.
    I might be given a tungsten lamp from a closeddown photoclub, if they can find the piece that hold the thing together
    Does anyone know how to calculate the expose from the W when working with these things ? which F-stop @ 1/60sec can I use with a 150W or a 250W lamp ?
    Regards Søren

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Soeren
    Ouch, I can imagine the smell "who ordered pork roast ?"
    Modeller med sprød svær...mums

  3. #13
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soeren
    Does anyone know how to calculate the expose from the W when working with these things ? which F-stop @ 1/60sec can I use with a 150W or a 250W lamp ?
    Regards Søren
    Eh - no. The variation is too big. There's no usable correlation. It depends on the distance as well, of course...


    Morten - does latex go shiny when it melts?
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole
    Morten - does latex go shiny when it melts?
    Hmmm...I have never tried to expose latex to high temps, but PVC will melt and may burst into flames if too hot. Therefore I use flash.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole
    Morten - does latex go shiny when it melts?
    You can buy liquid latex to paint on your subject. When liquid it is shiny.
    Søren

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Soeren
    You can buy liquid latex to paint on your subject. When liquid it is shiny.
    Søren
    HEEY STOP
    youre making me participate in treadjacking my own tread
    Søren

  7. #17

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    Ok....back to....what was it...?

    Yeah, flash and floods!

  8. #18
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soeren
    You can buy liquid latex to paint on your subject. When liquid it is shiny.
    Søren
    As a side note (yet another one), that stuff is great for patching small holes in camera bellows. Use the black variety, and remember to put polish or talcum on when dry, before folding the bellows.

    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soeren
    . . . Does anyone know how to calculate the expose from the W when working with these things ? which F-stop @ 1/60sec can I use with a 150W or a 250W lamp ?
    I agree with Ole - there are too many variables involved to calculate this reliably. It dpends on the efficiency of the light itself, the nature of the enclosure/reflector, etc., etc., etc. The simple method is to buy a bulb at your local hardware store and meter it. But, I suspect you'll be shocked at how little light they actually put out for photographic purposes. I can get f/5.6 @ 1/125 out of my 650W Arri fresnel, but no one can bear to face the light, let alone open their eyes.

    I think you'll find that anything above 100W, or so, starts to get "uncomfortable" for the subject - if it is strongly directional (e.g. the conical-shaped standard "flood" or "spot" bulbs from the hardware). A larger, more diffuse source tends to be easier on the subject. For inanimate objects, the bright Halogen garage lights work reasonably well. In DIY terms for people, you might think about a home-built bank of 4' fluorescent tubes - tricky for color work, but not a problem for B&W.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by rbarker
    I agree with Ole - there are too many variables involved to calculate this reliably. It dpends on the efficiency of the light itself, the nature of the enclosure/reflector, etc., etc., etc. The simple method is to buy a bulb at your local hardware store and meter it. But, I suspect you'll be shocked at how little light they actually put out for photographic purposes. I can get f/5.6 @ 1/125 out of my 650W Arri fresnel, but no one can bear to face the light, let alone open their eyes.

    I think you'll find that anything above 100W, or so, starts to get "uncomfortable" for the subject - if it is strongly directional (e.g. the conical-shaped standard "flood" or "spot" bulbs from the hardware). A larger, more diffuse source tends to be easier on the subject. For inanimate objects, the bright Halogen garage lights work reasonably well. In DIY terms for people, you might think about a home-built bank of 4' fluorescent tubes - tricky for color work, but not a problem for B&W.

    Not exactly good news. Well I am recieving a lamp today and I will order a daylight bulp at Brenner or Impex soon so I can try it out myself.
    Thanks for all your replies and Morten let us know if you get a set of those hotlamps, how they work etc.
    Regards Søren

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