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  1. #11
    Helen B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bighead
    Not to hog the thread but to those of you that prefer hotlights, what is a good brand that offers some light controlling accessories??
    The people who make light control accessories, like Chimera and Lighttools, make them for most hot lights. Companies like dedolight and Lowel offer a wide range of lights and accessories, both of which I use and recommend - dedo especially. Dedo lights are truly great, but beware that their accessories are often re-badged equipment at twice the price of the original manufacturer's equivalent. Dedos probably have a place in still photography simply because there is nothing else quite like them, whether continuous or flash/strobe. Lowel offer many versatile little gizmos.

    A lot of the light control equipment that is used with continuous lights is not specific to one brand or another - stands, scrims, gels, flags and reflectors that work with any light. Matthews make sturdy stuff at a sturdy price. My all-time favourite stand, which I can find a use for on almost every set, is their 'Magic Stand with Runway Base'. Manfrotto and Lowel equipment isn't as heavily built, but it is still plenty robust enough for most people.

    Best,
    Helen

  2. #12
    Charles Webb's Avatar
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    Again, "for what it's is worth" Strobe lighting can be just as fine and delicate as the persons who is using it's skill will allow. The exact same lighting can be achieved accomplished with either one, hot or cold if the user knows what he/she is doing. It is absolute hogwash that one is better than the other. It is a personal psychological thing in your head. Hot light will not do one thing better or more efficiently than a skilled strobe person can do with knowledge of what each lamp head will do or not do. Spot effects are the most difficult to recreate, but can be done with with creative placement of each light perhaps using a light modifying device, like a snoot, gobo, flag or what ever. The exact same devices are absolutely necessary for either type of light to totally be controlled.


    The whole thing boils down to what each individual likes, dislikes, owns, wants to spend, or has heard from a friend or from a list like this one that leads him/her to believe Mazda, (Which I learned with) which is today called hot light is superior in quality to strobe lighting. My reply/comment here is simply bull--it since my experience and others experiences over the past fifty five years has already proven repeatably otherwise. Still life images can easily be made effectively with either, hot or strobe, it all depends on your choice, skill and opinion which you chose.

    You cannot tell the difference from two finished prints one made from each type of light if the camera/lighting technician did his job and is worth his salt!

    My opinion based on "having been there and done that"

    Charlie

  3. #13
    Bosaiya's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    I'm more or less at the same point. I've decided against hot lights.

    1) They really are hot.

    2) It takes a lot of watts to put out much light. The 1250 watt lights mentioned are more then 10 amps for those of us in North America. Yikes. Two of them would trip most breakers I bet.
    Hi Nick, this is not entirely accurate. People tend to mistakenly refer to all continuous lighting as "hot lights" even though that is not always the case. If you are talking about incandecent or HMI lights then yes, they tend to be "hot" and expensive to run. However those are not your only two options.

    These days I do almost all of my artificial lighting with daylight-balanced flourecents that give off a huge amount of light, very little heat, and use little juice. My work is almost all macro and I get the lights within a couple inches of the subjects. I tried this once (and only once) with incandecent lights, it didn't work so well. Flashes were too difficult to adjust, align and measure.

    Don't completely write off "hot" lights unless you've already got your mind made up. Take a look at lighting designed for cinematography, not still photography. The options are as endless as your imagination.

  4. #14

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    How well do they work with colour film? I remember somebody mentioned using flourscents to make a softbox. Still would seem to take a lot of tubes to put out much light. I know they are much more efficient then other bulbs and they can be had in some pretty large sizes. They make compact 100Watt floursent bulbs. Four of those would be like a 2000watt fixture I bet.

  5. #15

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    Clay, tommorow I will make photographs using not even real photography hot lights, but lights made for construction works. Price: 25 euro/USD for one housing on stand included 500W halogen lamp. One note: amount of light from that ordinary halogen is less than real photographic 500w halogen lamp, but if you want to go cheap, then...

    CAUTION 1: Be carefull not to injure yourself or potential model(s), or burn something as temperature of those lights is high.

    CAUTION 2: You MUST use protection glass or wire net in front of halogen bulb as those bulbs can explode and make injuries.

  6. #16
    Bosaiya's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    How well do they work with colour film? I remember somebody mentioned using flourscents to make a softbox. Still would seem to take a lot of tubes to put out much light. I know they are much more efficient then other bulbs and they can be had in some pretty large sizes. They make compact 100Watt floursent bulbs. Four of those would be like a 2000watt fixture I bet.
    They're daylight balanced so they look like any other light source. Very soft light, of course.

    I wouldn't use regular household flourecent lights, that's an inefficient way to do it, although I have in fact lit scenes with them. The comparison is like apples to oranges, both are fruit, but completely different. You would want flouros that are meant for photographic lighting.

    They've all got lumens ratings so you can do comparisons between them and hot lights.

  7. #17
    Bosaiya's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by haris
    Clay, tommorow I will make photographs using not even real photography hot lights, but lights made for construction works. Price: 25 euro/USD for one housing on stand included 500W halogen lamp. One note: amount of light from that ordinary halogen is less than real photographic 500w halogen lamp, but if you want to go cheap, then...

    CAUTION 1: Be carefull not to injure yourself or potential model(s), or burn something as temperature of those lights is high.

    CAUTION 2: You MUST use protection glass or wire net in front of halogen bulb as those bulbs can explode and make injuries.
    The big problem with shop lights is that they are not color balanced. It may not make any difference for what you want to use them for, which is pretty much relegating to blasting light all over the place, but if you are doing color work you'll have a tough time matching anything. I used them for a few shoots early on and decided it was worth the money to invest in something that had more control both in terms of the temperature and light fall.

  8. #18

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    Daylight lamps are available without the photographic label on them. I guess we all know what happens to prices once you stick "photographic" on anything. 5500K I think. Might be 5100K. Is that all that's need? Or is it more complicated?


    The compacts I was talking about aren't home lamps. They're intend to replace big industrial lamps. The sort of lights that go high up in a warehouse or other high ceiling locations. 300 or 500 watt old style lamps.

  9. #19
    Bosaiya's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    Daylight lamps are available without the photographic label on them. I guess we all know what happens to prices once you stick "photographic" on anything. 5500K I think. Might be 5100K. Is that all that's need? Or is it more complicated?
    But of course. At the same time some people need the added reliability and dependability of dedicated equipment and don't mind paying for it. Me, I make my own unless it's cheaper to buy it.

    It really depends on what you need. You tell us! You're looking for lumens, the more the better. Compare against a value you know will work for you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    The compacts I was talking about aren't home lamps. They're intend to replace big industrial lamps. The sort of lights that go high up in a warehouse or other high ceiling locations. 300 or 500 watt old style lamps.
    Those sound like they would certainly do the trick. If the price is right then try a few and let us know what you think. The ones I have now are cheap (in every sense of the word). They work well for macro and for reasonably tight portraiture, but they fall off fast and aren't designed to be moved about much. I used a bunch on location for a movie once and at the end of the night we had gone through quite a few bulbs. But it looked real good!

  10. #20

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    Some times it seems they just put a sticker saying "Photo grade" on things and hike the prices. :rolleyes:

    What I want/need is enough light to do small portraits [1 or 2 people sort of thing] Standing. MF so F/8 to F/11 with film speeds of say 64 to 125. I'd like the same setup to handle LF. Say F/22 with film speed of 320. Both c-41 and B&W for MF. B&W for LF.

    How I get the light is an issue I'm flexible with.

    Right now I can't find the really big lamps. The 68watt one is rated at 4200 intial lumens.

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