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  1. #41
    Charles Webb's Avatar
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    Wow,
    My photogenics @ 400ws, recycle quicker than I can replace a slide and change the holder and pull the slide. I can't imagine needing or using a motor drive for still life! But then I also push the fact, that there is a place for both types of lighting. The exact same effects can be achieved with either one if the operator knows how! There is no way in my mind to learn "lighting"
    without first learning to see light and how it works! All the lighting diagrams in the world are worthless unless you can "see" what is happening when you use them. Window light and reflectors have made wonderful still life photographs since the beginning of picture making. It in my estimation is still one of the quickest and best ways to learn how to control light available.

    Lighting is not rocket science, but more like figuring out a two cushion shot at the local pool room. Drop a super ball straight down, where does it bounce?

    Charlie...........................

  2. #42
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    I started in studios with hot lights, up to 10k. It was truly a great way to learn lighting, and I am very blessed for the experience. I still find it easier to get what I'm after using hot lights, but they are not universally practical for many situations outside a studio, for reasons already mentioned in this thread. Curiously, I found one of the best uses for the DSLR my occupation forces me to own, was as a preview camera for flash work. Once I determined how it related to different emulsions in regard to tonality and ratio, the DSLR became a great accessory for my film cameras. I don't do this so much anymore, but at the time it was a great tool for my "flash" education. Funny though, a $8000 digigizmo doing duty as a ratio/light meter for a wood and brass camera. Still makes me snicker.

  3. #43
    Charles Webb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean Tang
    Not this kind of hard box, Charles. The Profoto hardbox is a point light source to simulate light on a clear cloudless day. The hardbox is blackened internally to enhance this effect.

    Sean,
    I am totally confused by your post. What are you talking about in saying "not this kind of hard box" ?

    My quote, "We put anything in them we could find for a light source."

    For some reason do you think we failed to try "Point Source" lights in those early "hard" boxes? Every printing operation I knew of a back then were using point source lighting in their stripping areas and/or arc for plate burning! I really do need clarifacation of what you mean by what you posted!
    The simple fact is, the point source techinology if you want to call it that was readily available. But gained us nothing by using it!

    Charlie...................

  4. #44

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    Charles the strobes that I use are made by Photogenic. They are the models sold by Photography Warehouse. Some of the still lifes involve a flowing liquid...this is where a motor drive is handy.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  5. #45
    Charles Webb's Avatar
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    Ms Anne,
    Makes perfect sense to me! My photogenics were purchased in the early fifties, but continue to answer the call when I need them. I now have several power packs and a couple of dozen heads, they work for me!

    Charlie.................................

  6. #46

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    Charlie you sweetheart. You can call me Mr Claire if you wish..Just Claire works good also,
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  7. #47

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    When I first considered using lighting, my first thought was using hotlights.
    The idea was that I want light, but don't want to get involved in anything I didn't know before. In other words, I didn't want to think about apertures, watseconds, sync etc. and I wanted to see my light before I shoot.

    The habit sort of stayed, but now I'd like to use daylight films, without the use of anything in front of my lens, and I'm more and more attracted about the mobility of a flash system with a power pack, plus the efficiency of power use (you only burn the bulb when taking an exposure), lack of heat etc.

    So I'm considering getting a starters kit with maybe two compact strobes.

    But only after I switch to medium format.
    And I'm really serious about that, I've already bought some film for the freezer:
    (5 rolls of Ektachrome 100 plus, 3 rolls of 64T and 5 rolls of 64 is a good start)

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