Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,523   Posts: 1,572,259   Online: 773
      
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Was New Zealand, now Hong Kong
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    372
    Images
    2

    Photographing an ice sculpture

    I have been asked to photograph an ice sculpture that is going to be part of an exhibition. The idea is to document it as it melts and the photographs then become part of the installation.

    I am going to shoot it on Kodak 160 VC in 4x5. Unfortunately the existing lighting is heavily tungsten biased so am going to need to use some sort of fill. Was thinking of renting a softbox as hot lights would kill the sculpture to quickly.

    Am I heading in the right direction? Any suggestions/advice would be welcome.

    David
    David Boyce

    When bankers get together for dinner, they discuss art. When artists get together for dinner, they discuss money. Oscar Wilde Blog fp4.blogspot.com

  2. #2
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Blue Ridge, Virginia, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,891
    Images
    241
    If your objective is to overcome the tungsten lights to avoid a color cast, I would think you'd need more than one strobe/softbox as a "fill." You might need a mainlight, fill, and with ice I'd explore the possibilities of backlighting.

    If the tungsten lighting is strong enough, have you considered tungsten balanced film, or correction filters? Since the ice is static, long exposure times should not be a problem.


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

    blog: https://danhendersonphotographer.wordpress.com/

    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Was New Zealand, now Hong Kong
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    372
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by FirePhoto
    If your objective is to overcome the tungsten lights to avoid a color cast, I would think you'd need more than one strobe/softbox as a "fill." You might need a mainlight, fill, and with ice I'd explore the possibilities of backlighting.

    If the tungsten lighting is strong enough, have you considered tungsten balanced film, or correction filters? Since the ice is static, long exposure times should not be a problem.
    Hi FirePhoto

    Thanks for the feedback and ideas, have been thinking about the idea of using tungsten balanced film and or correction filters. Was also thinking, to get deffinition I might need more than one light, so your suggestion is good. Hmmmmm, more thinking needed.

    Part of the fun is doing this at the opening of the exhibition...
    David Boyce

    When bankers get together for dinner, they discuss art. When artists get together for dinner, they discuss money. Oscar Wilde Blog fp4.blogspot.com

  4. #4
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,282
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    You could filter the strobe(s) to the same colour temperature.
    Or you could use tungsten balanced film, and just accept the strobes as blue highlights.
    Or...
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  5. #5
    narsuitus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    561
    I think you have received some good advice.

    I would use Kodak Portra 100T tungsten color negative film (ISO 100) or Fuji NPL 160 tungsten color negative film (ISO 160).

    I would cover my flash units with an orange filter to convert the 5600 Kelvin light to 3200 Kelvin.

    I would take two shots of each stage of the melting process: one with only the available tungsten room light and the other with the room light plus color corrected fill flash and backlighting.

    I would also use two black panels to block the backlights from my lens.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Was New Zealand, now Hong Kong
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    372
    Images
    2
    Well I have ended up, after talking with the artist, with two hot lights, diffusers, reflectors and some Tungsten balanced film. The idea is to use the hot lights for very brief periods of time. Will play around with a chunk of glass tomorrow to see how it all comes off.

    Thanks all for the advice and help everyone, much appreciated.
    David Boyce

    When bankers get together for dinner, they discuss art. When artists get together for dinner, they discuss money. Oscar Wilde Blog fp4.blogspot.com

  7. #7
    rbarker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Rio Rancho, NM
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,222
    Images
    2
    FWIW, David, I think you'll find that photographing ice is very much like photographing glass. Surface shape will be defined by the spectral relections from large white light sources (e.g. one or more large softboxes or large white reflector panels). To those white surface reflections, you can add reflections of tall black panels to help define selected edges. Then, add transmitted light from lights in typical small silver reflectors behind the ice, or bounced off a reflective surface behind the ice. Color can be added by gelling the transmitted lights.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    New Zealand
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,410
    Images
    4
    Sounds like a fun assignment David. Where's the exhibition?

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Was New Zealand, now Hong Kong
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    372
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by John McCallum
    Sounds like a fun assignment David. Where's the exhibition?
    The Hong Kong visual arts centre. The piece is part of a show called Asian Traffic and is by another New Zealander now living in Hong Kong. It's proving to be an interesting collaboration.
    David Boyce

    When bankers get together for dinner, they discuss art. When artists get together for dinner, they discuss money. Oscar Wilde Blog fp4.blogspot.com



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin