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  1. #21
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner
    Ok I read up (sideways) on the closest thing to this meter I could find-here-

    http://www.gossen-photo.de/pdf/ba_lunasixf_e.pdf

    If your meter operates the same (it probably does) you have to set the meter to flash, then depress, and release the meter button, then trigger the flash, then calculate the reading using your chosen ASA and 1/60 of a second as your shutter speed. So you push and release the button first, then trigger the flash. Theoretically, at least thats how I read it. No sync needed. Never seen this before. But I live in Utah If that doesn't do it, IDK.
    I think you (djkloss) may be taking your reading from the wrong section of the meter's dials. Check the face of your meter for a "lightning bolt" - if it is like mine that is the mark you need to refer to, not a particular shutter speed.

    I have and use a Gossen Profisix (a European/Canadian designation) with flash metering attachment. It works in much the same way as the Lunasix F referred to above.

    My questions are:

    1) is your meter one of the ones that uses a needle, that you need to "null" - i.e. do you need to adjust the meter dials until the needle is over a mark?
    2) if so, when you are reading the f/stop suggested, what are you using as the reference mark?

    On my meter, I place the meter at the subject location and point it back (either to the flash, or the camera position, depending on my purposes and on how many flashes I am using). I then push the button that turns the meter on, then a "start" button (on the accessory unit) that initializes the meter. The needle moves all the way to the left. I then trigger the flash, and the meter needle responds by moving to a location, and stopping.

    I then rotate the meter dial until the needle lines up with the "O" or null mark.

    Then, I read the f/stop by noting where the special flash indicator (a stylized lightning bolt) is located adjacent to the f/stop dial.

    The "lightning bolt" is on the shutter speed dial, but is not there to indicate a shutter speed. The flash meter function ignores shutter speeds.

    On my meter, the "lightning bolt" is located on the between the 1 second and 2 second marks. Yours may very well be at another location.

    Edit: as I look again at the instruction manual referenced above - I see that the "lightning bolt" is in the same location as on my meter. It is item 8 on the numbered list of markings/parts at the beginning of the manual.

    Hope this helps.

    Matt
    Last edited by MattKing; 06-08-2006 at 11:01 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: update and clarification

  2. #22
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Cool, someone with this meter, that is familiar with it. I do think the issue lies with the meter, or the operation, or reading of it, as a reading of 2.8 is way way to low.

  3. #23
    djkloss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing
    I think you (djkloss) may be taking your reading from the wrong section of the meter's dials. Check the face of your meter for a "lightning bolt" - if it is like mine that is the mark you need to refer to, not a particular shutter speed.

    I have and use a Gossen Profisix (a European/Canadian designation) with flash metering attachment. It works in much the same way as the Lunasix F referred to above.

    My questions are:

    1) is your meter one of the ones that uses a needle, that you need to "null" - i.e. do you need to adjust the meter dials until the needle is over a mark?
    2) if so, when you are reading the f/stop suggested, what are you using as the reference mark?

    On my meter, I place the meter at the subject location and point it back (either to the flash, or the camera position, depending on my purposes and on how many flashes I am using). I then push the button that turns the meter on, then a "start" button (on the accessory unit) that initializes the meter. The needle moves all the way to the left. I then trigger the flash, and the meter needle responds by moving to a location, and stopping.

    I then rotate the meter dial until the needle lines up with the "O" or null mark.

    Then, I read the f/stop by noting where the special flash indicator (a stylized lightning bolt) is located adjacent to the f/stop dial.

    The "lightning bolt" is on the shutter speed dial, but is not there to indicate a shutter speed. The flash meter function ignores shutter speeds.

    On my meter, the "lightning bolt" is located on the between the 1 second and 2 second marks. Yours may very well be at another location.

    Edit: as I look again at the instruction manual referenced above - I see that the "lightning bolt" is in the same location as on my meter. It is item 8 on the numbered list of markings/parts at the beginning of the manual.

    Hope this helps.

    Matt
    Matt,

    Thank you! Yes it has a lightning bolt on the face and I think you hit the nail on the head!

    Thank you!

    Dorothy

  4. #24
    blansky's Avatar
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    I agree.

    The room you're shooting in etc is not the problem. It is simply the meter or the reading of it. Concentrate on those.


    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  5. #25
    Helen B's Avatar
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    I'm not so sure. If Watt is on second then Who is on first, and the Infield Fly Rule applies.

  6. #26
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by djkloss
    I'm using a Gossen flash meter and tried it both with reflective reading and incident. With just the modeling lights i got a reading of 1/8 sec @ f/5.6.
    ... and with the 1400 w/s flash, there was LESS light, by two stops ... 1/8 second; f/2.8??

    How? -- What?? When the Speedotron is fired, there is LESS light? Either there is a problem with the meter or the operation of it ... or the Brownlines are emitting the fabled "darkons" -- anti-photons!!
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helen B
    I'm not so sure. If Watt is on second then Who is on first, and the Infield Fly Rule applies.
    I tried applying that with my strobes once, but I guess my bulb was too dim.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  8. #28
    djkloss's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Sukach
    ... How? -- What?? ... there is a problem with the operator ...
    True enough...as we used to say... operator error...I guess it helps if you know your equipment. A simple thing like a lightning bolt on the dial... duh! go figure!

    How many apugers does it take to analyze a light meter?

    This is one lesson I won't forget!

  9. #29
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by djkloss
    True enough...as we used to say... operator error...I guess it helps if you know your equipment. A simple thing like a lightning bolt on the dial... duh! go figure!

    How many apugers does it take to analyze a light meter?

    This is one lesson I won't forget!
    Well, we all got to the bottom of it, eventually. It is great that we are here for each other, and that nobody likes kicking around a problem, like an APUGer.

  10. #30
    blansky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by djkloss
    True enough...as we used to say... operator error...I guess it helps if you know your equipment. A simple thing like a lightning bolt on the dial... duh! go figure!

    How many apugers does it take to analyze a light meter?

    This is one lesson I won't forget!
    What. Are you kidding?

    Every photographer goes through this stuff. All equipment is different, every manufacturer has some brilliant idea and screws up the works.

    You ain't seen nothing yet.

    This one didn't even cause any personal injury.


    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

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