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  1. #21
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Hicks
    Dear Jason,

    Absolutely! Practice may not make perfect, but it sure as hell improves the odds.

    Cheers,

    R.
    It does! What I have got out of it, is when I take a reading, sometimes its just not right, and further investigation is called for. Usually its an ASA mistake, but sometimes more. If I hadn't a clue what to expect, I would be less likely to know when things go wrong in the field, and instead be standing in the darkroom staring at an opaque negative, with an equally opaque look on my face.

  2. #22

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    Either type of meter will work. It is just a tool and as any tool, it needs to be used properly to provide what you need.

    I like an incident meter...I used a spotmeter for over twenty years and it worked fine. The mental distance between composing and exposure is a lot shorter for me with an inciident meter.


    I find most of my exposures are usually 1/2 second at F22...in fact I don't mess with the meter some days and my exposures and development gives me prints that I want.
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  3. #23
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    There is no one way, circumstances differ, and people differ.

    An incident meter AND a spot meter are in my bag.

    It's only partially a conceptual choice, like a woodworker's hand going to the right tool. Practice, practice, practice.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by snegron
    Thanks for all the input, however, I am still a bit confused! Let's use an example:

    Let's say I am using Porta VC, ISO 160 film outside and I want to photograph a tree and the surrounding landscape. The tree will be on the left of my frame and the rest of the scene will be on the right. There is more light on the right side of the frame, the tree has more shadows. I want to have as much detail from the tree as well as the background. It is late afternoon/early evening and my "tree" reading indicates 125 sec at F5.6, but my background reading indicates 125 sec at F16. Now what? Do I average it all out to 125 at F8, maybe F11? Will a spot meter give me the readings of the tree and the background and then I have to do the math and come up with the average reading on my own?

    Let's say we have the same readings for the same scenario as above, only this time I am using slide film. Would this change my average meter reading?

    Also, does subject distance influence the reading in a spot meter? Will I still get 125 at 5.6 from the tree at 10 feet away vs. 1000 feet away?
    3 stops is a low contrast so you won't go much wrong with either B&W negs or color slides. How to deal with low- and highcontrasts subjects I will let others more knowledgeable tell you
    If I recall correctly B&W film holds about 7 stops in subject brightness range and slides will manage 5. Your problems starts when your subject is close to or exceeds that. Your tree reads 1/30 sec f/4 your background reads 1/250 f/22 = 8 stops your average will be something like 1/125 f/8 but that wile seriously underexpose your tree so no details here. So you take a spot reading from the tree and adjust your exposure 2,5 - 3 stops (test) and let highlight be highlights. How to deal with high and low contrast........ ROGER, LES SOMONE HELP Its something with overeksposing and underdeveloping for highcontrast and vice versa for lowcontrast.
    Your meter will see what your lens sees so distance won't matter much except for the mist.
    Cheers, Søren
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  5. #25
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by snegron
    Would using an ND filter work for color film and transparency?
    Yes, and B&W as well, although most B&W photographers don't use them. BTW, if you check out this page: http://www.visionlandscapes.com/Reso...Resource=Books you can see my recommended list of books that can help. Particulary the books by Jack Dykinga and John Fielder. Both have excellent sections on metering.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  6. #26

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    Backwards first.

    If you use a spot meter to meter something at 10 feet, you would not get the same reading as something 1000 feet away. At ten feet you can meter part of a subject. At 1000 feet you can meter part of a mountain but not one part of a tree. As you progress in distance your field of view for that 1 degree has more in it. You also have an issue with the air and it's light filtering effects. DIfferent areas have different conditions. But I would hazzard a guess that, even here in the desert Southwest, you would see less light being reflected at that greater distance. I may be completely wrong on this.

    The Scenario you mentioned gave a three stop difference, and you are using portra VC which is negative film, so you are going to be well within the limits of the film. I would over expose by one stop to get more shadow detail and punch the colors. This three stop difference is what i usually deal with. I would use an incident meter. Step out in front of the camera aim the bulb at the lens and use that for the exposure, as long as you are not casting a shadow on the meter. If I were using transparency film I would meter the bright spot and then underexpose a tad to punch the colors, because this scene is within the limits of transparency film.

    Robert:
    Why would you use a split ND filter in a scene of such small difference between highs and lows?
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  7. #27
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark
    Robert:
    Why would you use a split ND filter in a scene of such small difference between highs and lows?
    Primarily because of the small latitude provided by a film like Fuji Velvia; I'm not unique in this respect. Check out the work of Joe Cornish, you will find that he uses split neutral density filters for differences as small as a half stop.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  8. #28
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    Thanks again for all the feedback! I am now leaning more toward a light meter that includes both incident and spot metering functions. I think I would like to try both methods and see what results I would get. I guess the confusion would come if both methods show very different exposures.

  9. #29

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    They may very well show VERY different exposures, and most of the time.

    Robert. Maybe i should try this. I have ordered two boxes of Velvia 50 for this falll shooting season and you know the film a hell of a lot better than I. I usually use Provia but this summer the greens were not doing it for me. Just not giving me what i wanted, hence the velvia 50 purchase, and, next payday, a box of the 100.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  10. #30

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    any meter can only give a suggested exposure setting, you've got to think about what it is really telling you

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