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  1. #11
    colrehogan's Avatar
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    A friend of mine who is running a part-time photography business has a couple of Alien Bees lights. He had to turn them up quite a bit for me to take some 8x10 portraits on Provia 100F, with an f/11 19 in. Apochromat Artar, but I was able to get some reasonably exposed shots. I was shooting at f/11 @ 1/60. Sorry, I don't recall what specific model of lights he has beyond that brand name.
    Diane

    Halak 41

  2. #12
    Dave Wooten's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by colrehogan
    A friend of mine who is running a part-time photography business has a couple of Alien Bees lights. He had to turn them up quite a bit for me to take some 8x10 portraits on Provia 100F, with an f/11 19 in. Apochromat Artar, but I was able to get some reasonably exposed shots. I was shooting at f/11 @ 1/60. Sorry, I don't recall what specific model of lights he has beyond that brand name.
    That sounds about right Diane, I think the most powerful Alien Bee is around 600....pretty anemic when you need to stop down to 64 and more....of course if you are shooting wide open and not so concerned about DOF it is less of a problem

  3. #13
    colrehogan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Wooten
    That sounds about right Diane, I think the most powerful Alien Bee is around 600....pretty anemic when you need to stop down to 64 and more....of course if you are shooting wide open and not so concerned about DOF it is less of a problem
    Yes, he had just purchased the lights and was trying to get the hang of using them prior to using them with paying customers. I thought it might be fun and it was, though it was a bit of a challenge to figure out how to set it up for those conditions. I also shot some Tri-X, which gave a little more leeway for exposure. Since it was a studio setting with a black background, I wasn't too worried about the background. However, I failed to notice the lighting support (boom?) in the top left corner until we were almost done. :rolleyes:
    Diane

    Halak 41

  4. #14
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    It depends on the look you want. If you want a fairly conventional sharp portrait with umbrellas or softboxes, you probably want something in the ballpark of 3000 Watt-seconds or more in total (bearing in mind that Watt-seconds are not a measure of light output, which depends on the efficiency of the head, reflectors or diffusers in place). If you like short DOF and selective focus, you can get by with considerably less.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  5. #15
    colrehogan's Avatar
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    I got to try an old brass lens at a workshop recently and it gave some interesting results. I was going to post some pics last weekend and never got around to it.
    Diane

    Halak 41

  6. #16
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    I'm going to go out on a limb here and assume you all are talking about strobes and not hot lights. Am I right in thinking that with b/w the type of light isn't important, rather it's the amount?

    I'd really like to further explore shooting portraits but I mostly shoot with brass lenses and packard shutters. I think I might find some sort of balance with hot lights in a cold garage...

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by MenacingTourist
    I'm going to go out on a limb here and assume you all are talking about strobes and not hot lights. Am I right in thinking that with b/w the type of light isn't important, rather it's the amount?

    I'd really like to further explore shooting portraits but I mostly shoot with brass lenses and packard shutters. I think I might find some sort of balance with hot lights in a cold garage...
    Multiply the watt numbers mentioned for strobes by something like 10X. The advantage you have with hot lights is you can go for longer exposures. But how long are you willing to go? Of course you could clamp the person down

  8. #18
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    So a 300 w strobe would have the power of 3000 w hot lights?

    Whats the diffrence between a flash and a strobe? Im a complete novice at this.

    Cheers Johannes




    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    Multiply the watt numbers mentioned for strobes by something like 10X. The advantage you have with hot lights is you can go for longer exposures. But how long are you willing to go? Of course you could clamp the person down

  9. #19
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    There is no difference between a "flash" and a "strobe." They are the same thing. Some people tend to think of studio flash units as "strobes" but really they are used interchangeably.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  10. #20
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    Ohh ok, Would it take 3000 watts of strobe power ? That seems like alot, maybe 11x14 is hard for portraits, i would really like to have the ability to take sharp portraits to.

    In my ignorance i tought that some portable small flashes would be enough to make it abit lighter, to use the strobes as some kind of "reflector" and use mainly the avalible light.


    Does anyone of you with alot of knowledge have msn feel free to add me
    aus_der_welt@msn.com i would like to have some with alot of knowhow to talk with.

    Cheers Johannes



    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    There is no difference between a "flash" and a "strobe." They are the same thing. Some people tend to think of studio flash units as "strobes" but really they are used interchangeably.

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