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  1. #1
    dustym's Avatar
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    Help! Any resource for flash photography

    I have been asked at short notice to do some work next saturday that will need flash , Ive got a metz 45 ct-1 cant find any operating instuctions on it.
    Can someone guide me to a crash course on flash photography.
    What you do for friends in need


    rgfds
    Dusty
    www.clikpic.com/essexmonochrome
    The camera cannot lie, but it cannot help being selective.

  2. #2
    Helen B's Avatar
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    Hi Dusty,

    This is a big subject - could you narrow it down a little by describing what the job requires?

    Best,
    Helen
    PS I had a look at your website. Is your name on any of the pages?

  3. #3
    dustym's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helen B View Post
    Hi Dusty,

    This is a big subject - could you narrow it down a little by describing what the job requires?

    Best,
    Helen
    PS I had a look at your website. Is your name on any of the pages?
    Its a big favour he wants me to photograph his wedding,(last minute thing)
    Its a big task but nobody else can help.
    I feel like a fish out of water because its so specialist.
    All I have is an RB 67 and a Flashgun

    Just out of curiosity Helen why the question about my name is it a copywrite
    issue ?

    Rgds
    Shaun
    www.clikpic.com/essexmonochrome
    The camera cannot lie, but it cannot help being selective.

  4. #4
    MikeSeb's Avatar
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    Your friend is a brave one asking you to shoot his wedding--unless you are experienced at this sort of thing--and you are even, er, braver for accepting. Is the bride into martial arts, competitive shooting, or toxicology, by any chance?

    Start here:http://strobist.blogspot.com

    and good luck.
    Michael Sebastian
    Website | Blog

  5. #5
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    Your local library should have a book or two that includes a chapter about using flash for groups and individuals. The the RB67's manual will show how to attach and use a flash and a lot of Metz manuals can be downloaded here - don't know if they have your particular model, or one close enough to it: http://www.metz.de/en/service_suppor...onics.128.html

    Never use flash myself and would tell any such friend to pay for a Pro to do the wedding and would run a mile myself to avoid doing it! Needless to say, get a lot of practice in before Sat.

    Good luck, Bob.

  6. #6
    Helen B's Avatar
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    A wedding huh? As Bob says, get as much practice as you can before Saturday and send the bill to your 'friend'. If you are going to use a Metz 45 I suggest that you get hold of a simple reflector or small softbox. Have you got a meter that will measure flash? Are the formals inside or outside?

    "Just out of curiosity Helen why the question about my name is it a copywrite
    issue ?"


    It wasn't a copyright issue, it was just curiosity. I was intrigued by the idea of an anonymous website.

    Best,
    Helen

  7. #7
    dustym's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helen B View Post
    A wedding huh? As Bob says, get as much practice as you can before Saturday and send the bill to your 'friend'. If you are going to use a Metz 45 I suggest that you get hold of a simple reflector or small softbox. Have you got a meter that will measure flash? Are the formals inside or outside?

    "Just out of curiosity Helen why the question about my name is it a copywrite
    issue ?"


    It wasn't a copyright issue, it was just curiosity. I was intrigued by the idea of an anonymous website.

    Best,
    Helen
    Yes I have a sekonic with a flash setting, I have done some portrait work but using model lights.
    They also want it shot in Monochrome , they are pretty laidback by the whole thing which is good cause im not.
    Most of the work will be done inside judging by the long range forecast for Saturday

    rgds
    The camera cannot lie, but it cannot help being selective.

  8. #8

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    The Metz manuals are usually on the website. Hopefully they still have the manual for the CL-1 which is pretty close to yours. The differences are so small you have to go looking for them. Not the sort of things that matter. If they don't have the CL-1 manual grab the one for the current 45 model. Just ignore the section on TTL and the other advanced features. You've only got auto and manual mode.

  9. #9
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Get something to diffuse your flash (softbox, handkerchief, whatever) and take and develop some practice shots, using the auto-exposure function on the flash, quick! Be sure to include some bounce flash when you do.

    Also, take some using the flash on manual, using your flash meter.

    Be sure to use the film you intend to use and the lens(es) you intend to use for the wedding, and then develop using your standard procedure (if you have a variety of standard procedures, I'd lean to smooth tonality and moderate contrast).

    Check your negatives to see if the auto function results in good exposure. Check as well that the flash meter is accurate (for your camera, film and development).

    Here are some pre-wedding suggestions of things to check.

    If your flash uses AA batteries, get lots.

    Check to make sure that the flash sensor is clean and unobstructed. Check to make sure that the flashhead lens is clean and unobstructed.

    Make sure that the battery contacts are clean and make good contact. Make sure that the battery holder clicks in positively, and stays in - take some duct tape too!

    Make sure that your synch cord is in good shape, and makes good contact at either end. If at all possible, get a backup for the cord.

    If at all possible, take along a backup for the flash. Even if it hasn't nearly the power or flexibility, a second flash that works is infinitely better than a first flash that is broken.

    Flashes can yield a very satisfying learning experience when "dry fired". You can familiarize yourself with the adjustments and controls, without wasting film. If you can and do use rechargeable batteries, it is almost cost free.

    If your flash can use both rechargeable and non-rechargeable batteries, take both.

    If you have a PC tip conditioner, use it, and take it with you.

    Bounce flash works great - especially with just a little bit of reflector peeping over the top, to give catchlights.

    Try to have the flashhead above the lens, rather than to the side, whenever possible.

    Don't forget that reflectors can be used effectively with single flashes. Don't forget that window light can be great in weddings as well.

    Your RB67 lenses will synch at any speed. If by chance you also use a camera with a focal plane shutter, remember to set the right speed.

    This is a comment about the RB67 lenses - I don't have one. Some shutters (such as those in the Mamiya C series TLR lenses that I have) give you a choice as to which flash synch to use. If yours do, be sure that they are set to X (not FP).

    Now that I have given you a million things to think about, it would only be fair to provide some reassurance.

    I have 4 working Metz flashes that I have used for wedding work. I have used others as well. Metz makes very good flashes, that give good quality light on a repeatable basis. If working properly, they are well suited to wedding work, and in my experience they are rugged and reliable as well.

    Good luck.

    Matt

  10. #10
    dustym's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Get something to diffuse your flash (softbox, handkerchief, whatever) and take and develop some practice shots, using the auto-exposure function on the flash, quick! Be sure to include some bounce flash when you do.

    Also, take some using the flash on manual, using your flash meter.

    Be sure to use the film you intend to use and the lens(es) you intend to use for the wedding, and then develop using your standard procedure (if you have a variety of standard procedures, I'd lean to smooth tonality and moderate contrast).

    Check your negatives to see if the auto function results in good exposure. Check as well that the flash meter is accurate (for your camera, film and development).

    Here are some pre-wedding suggestions of things to check.

    If your flash uses AA batteries, get lots.

    Check to make sure that the flash sensor is clean and unobstructed. Check to make sure that the flashhead lens is clean and unobstructed.

    Make sure that the battery contacts are clean and make good contact. Make sure that the battery holder clicks in positively, and stays in - take some duct tape too!

    Make sure that your synch cord is in good shape, and makes good contact at either end. If at all possible, get a backup for the cord.

    If at all possible, take along a backup for the flash. Even if it hasn't nearly the power or flexibility, a second flash that works is infinitely better than a first flash that is broken.

    Flashes can yield a very satisfying learning experience when "dry fired". You can familiarize yourself with the adjustments and controls, without wasting film. If you can and do use rechargeable batteries, it is almost cost free.

    If your flash can use both rechargeable and non-rechargeable batteries, take both.

    If you have a PC tip conditioner, use it, and take it with you.

    Bounce flash works great - especially with just a little bit of reflector peeping over the top, to give catchlights.

    Try to have the flashhead above the lens, rather than to the side, whenever possible.

    Don't forget that reflectors can be used effectively with single flashes. Don't forget that window light can be great in weddings as well.

    Your RB67 lenses will synch at any speed. If by chance you also use a camera with a focal plane shutter, remember to set the right speed.

    This is a comment about the RB67 lenses - I don't have one. Some shutters (such as those in the Mamiya C series TLR lenses that I have) give you a choice as to which flash synch to use. If yours do, be sure that they are set to X (not FP).

    Now that I have given you a million things to think about, it would only be fair to provide some reassurance.

    I have 4 working Metz flashes that I have used for wedding work. I have used others as well. Metz makes very good flashes, that give good quality light on a repeatable basis. If working properly, they are well suited to wedding work, and in my experience they are rugged and reliable as well.

    Good luck.

    Matt
    Thanks Matt for taking the time , and the great advice, I start my practice to day and a APUG poster was kind enought to email me the user manual for my flashgun.

    Thanks to all

    Rgds
    Dusty
    The camera cannot lie, but it cannot help being selective.



 

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