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  1. #11
    blaze-on's Avatar
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    I cater more toward on location for corporate clients, well, at least it's the majority of my portrait work. They usually need updated photos every year for annual reports PSA's and such, so steady (yearly) recurrence. By setting up a simple backdrop (sometimes I use marbled piece of mat board), and three lights usually does it nice. Using their conference room, etc., a stool (I have a folder in case), you offer them convenience and they are happy with that aspect. That way the subject only misses 10-20 minutes. Not exactly intimate or specialty stuff, but it pays well.

    Other stuff I do in house as well, and don't have a rider for liability. I tear down and set up when needed. If it's more room I need (larger groups, fashion type stuff) I have a salon who lets me use their space in back, which has ample height. If that won't do it, I then rent a studio spot from the videographers I use (subcontract) for various jobs. They charge me very little, if any, as I often get them referrals.

    I'd love to have a dedicated space and wish you well. It sounds nice.
    The height is the only detriment and sounds like you've accepted working around that.

    The smell of fresh coffee would lure me just about anywhere...
    Matt's Photo Site
    "I invent nothing, I rediscover". Auguste Rodin

  2. #12
    Daniel_OB's Avatar
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    MattKing
    "You may also be increasing your chances for a break-in at your home."

    Yes this is a big problem, and even all kind of "polite" securities will not work very well. I think there is only one solution. Someone have to be at home ALL the time and even to show up his presence.
    A safe however heavy can also disappear with all its contents. Even I already have motion devices security, but what comes on my mind is to install and 110V electrical wire security inside the house (and I am able to make it) and inform police about the same.

    Matt, what is zonning?

    www.Leica-R.com

  3. #13
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Zoning is very important

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel_OB View Post
    Matt, what is zonning?

    www.Leica-R.com
    Daniel:

    Your municipality will have rules respecting what types of activities can occur in what areas - each area or "zone" will permit certain things, but not others.

    This allows areas that are set aside for uses such as residential to not have to deal with some of the problems (noise, traffic, etc.) that arise when you have commercial or industrial users nearby.

    It is very important that you check with the municipality. If your intended use is not permitted, they can close you down, fine you, and, in the worst case, come in and remove your equipment. In addition, non-permitted uses can have an affect on your insurance (studio lights + fire + denied coverage = awful).

    The municipality will also be the party that determines whether there are special rules requiring handicap access.

    Most residential areas permit some, but not all commercial use. You need to check!

    A local lawyer who specializes in zoning issues could help a lot.

    Hope this helps.

    Matt

  4. #14
    Daniel_OB's Avatar
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    Clear. Thank Matt a lot.
    www.Leica-R.com

  5. #15
    raucousimages's Avatar
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    My studio is in my basement but I also use my living room (great window light and grand piano) and my bedroom for glamour (vaulted ceiling) even the garage (think young bride,teddy, mustang). No one seems to mind where we shoot if the results are good, know the limitations of the room you are using. The greatest problem with a home studio is the house must be CLEAN! Dirty dished on the counter or laundry on the sofa won't cut it. If I can I shoot at the clients house. some of my clients have million dollar homes or great cars, boats Etc... and love to show them off. Use their home for the studio, it's their life you are photographing. Also use local parks, resorts, churches and other locations. With some of the locations within 10 miles of me why would I want to use my little studio if I dont need to. JBrunner is right, PPofA released a study that showed the studios with the highest profit margins were home based. I.E. low overhead.
    DIGITAL IS FOR THOSE AFRAID OF THE DARK.

  6. #16
    blansky's Avatar
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    If you are doing the kind of work that the public cannot get anywhere else, they don't care one bit where you studio is. They just want it.

    I don't use outside signs because of home invasion.

    My home is spotless at all times and nobody is around or visible but me. I don't want my clients feeling that they are intruding by walking into a home, so there is never anybody else sitting there or coming and going.

    Naturally all clients come by appointment only.

    As for disabled clients which I've never had, but I would get around it by offering to do work for them at their home, or another location. That way the disabilities act will not apply.

    Since I sell mostly large prints, I also deliver them to their home and even offer to hang them. That way they don't have to try and cart them home with them.

    Michael
    I couldn't think of anything witty to say so I left this blank.

  7. #17
    Gary Holliday's Avatar
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    People have remote studios down back streets and up steep staircases so as long as it's well lit and professional looking decor there will be no problem.

    I intend to do portraits in peoples' homes, but either way you'll need personal liabilty insurance for when your lighting stands mark their floor, or someone twists an ankle going down those stairs.

  8. #18
    Daniel_OB's Avatar
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    Thank a lot to everyone. So useful.
    With what is going around journalism, I decided to quit forever. I have intention to use the studio just in case someone want studio photograph, but I expect, when turn to portrait, the most shooting will be on location, and around 30% inside the studio. Studio is, I think, a must I need or not. It just shows how serious photog is, it shows his professionasm and comitment, it makes up perception about a photog. My basement is unfinished and large so I will make a nice and clean studio. I have one year to start my photography all over.

    Thanks again
    Daniel OB

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