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  1. #1
    Daniel_OB's Avatar
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    Place for a new photo studio

    I have to switch to studio people portrait photography, and I am building a nice and large studio in underground basement of my house.
    1. Can basement and walking downstairs be something distracting in mind of customers, something that will make them to say NO. Is “basement and walking downstairs” any disadvantage.
    3. Does it all looks professional and serious? Does it looks going into the hole?

    Anyone with experience around the same problem.
    www.Leica-R.com

  2. #2
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    A fellow Apuger who has extensive experience in the portrait world very recently told me that the home studio was now the most successful business model for portrait photographers.

    The basement will be of no disadvantage by its self. What is more important is that the space is finished and presented in a profesional manner. (so move the dungeon equipt somewhere else)

  3. #3
    Daniel_OB's Avatar
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    Thanks a lot Brunner. Your comment is so encouraging.

    To enter into the studio customers have to come into the house and walk down along nice and carpeted stairs. The studio area (and passage through house too) will be very nice, pleasing to eye, well ventilated and lighted, and with enough space for anyone to feel comfortable. It will consist of office with large mirrors plus makeup stuff, and free juice or coffee offer, darkroom, and large shooting room, all separated by walls. Examples of framed portraits already done, will be all over the place, except the shooting room. The height of the shooting room is not as I wish but I can handle the problem. Simple, the whole basement will be dedicated to the business.
    www.Leica-R.com

  4. #4
    MikeSeb's Avatar
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    I'm sure you know already to discuss this with your homeowners' insurance agent, to make sure you have adequate insurance for the liability exposure you will be facing. Most homeowners' policies won't cover risks for on-premise businesses without at least a rider, or perhaps a different policy altogether.

    I realize that your situation in Canada may be different than ours down here in Tort Land, but you'd hate to lose everything you've worked for because someone trips on those stairs.
    Michael Sebastian
    Website | Blog

  5. #5
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeSeb View Post
    I'm sure you know already to discuss this with your homeowners' insurance agent, to make sure you have adequate insurance for the liability exposure you will be facing. Most homeowners' policies won't cover risks for on-premise businesses without at least a rider, or perhaps a different policy altogether.

    I realize that your situation in Canada may be different than ours down here in Tort Land, but you'd hate to lose everything you've worked for because someone trips on those stairs.
    It sound to me you have it covered, and Michaels advice about the insurance is very worth looking in to. Make sure you are ok zoning wise, as well. Make or break for you will be based much more on your work, than where it is done. Many people are much more comfortable going to a residence, than the part of town many photo studios are in.

  6. #6
    MattKing's Avatar
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    In addition to zoning issues, you may have problems with legislated access requirements for the handicapped. Some areas require wheelchair access for new businesses.

    You may also be increasing your chances for a break-in at your home.

    The up side - the commute time to your studio will be great!

    Good luck.

    Matt

  7. #7
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Basements don't usually have high ceilings. One can work in all sorts of spaces, but if you're building a new studio, 12 foot ceilings or higher are a plus.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  8. #8
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    In addition to zoning issues, you may have problems with legislated access requirements for the handicapped. Some areas require wheelchair access for new businesses.

    You may also be increasing your chances for a break-in at your home.

    The up side - the commute time to your studio will be great!

    Good luck.

    Matt
    In Utah, access rules are generally waved for home-based business, but such endevours aren't allowed any substantial in and out traffic, as well. Most any problem you have with regulation will be based on the traffic and visibility of your business.

  9. #9
    eddym's Avatar
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    Once you get them to come to your house for a portrait, getting them to go down the stairs should be the least of your problems. Getting the client in the door is your biggest hurdle.
    I just closed my portrait studio after trying for 3 years to get all the Audis, BMWs, Lexuseses, and Range Rovers that drive right in front of it all day, every day, to turn into my parking lot. Very few of them did, so I'm going back to the "Studio in my house" and "-on location" tactics that I used before. At least the overhead was a lot lower!
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  10. #10
    copake_ham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    In addition to zoning issues, you may have problems with legislated access requirements for the handicapped. Some areas require wheelchair access for new businesses.

    You may also be increasing your chances for a break-in at your home.

    The up side - the commute time to your studio will be great!

    Good luck.

    Matt
    This was my thought also. A basement studio will deny access to most physically challenged individuals. Matt would know more about legal requirements in Canada.

    Is it possible to convert a garage instead? That would solve the access issue and also mitigate the break-ins risk.

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