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  1. #91

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    i've subsequently purchased 2 solo units of the same make, and now plan on rsplitting the dual unit into another 2 separates, thus totalling 4 lamps. i also have 6 250W halogen bulbs, 3 150W bulbs, and 3 100W bulbs.

    and, i bought a 50-ft roll of cinefoil.
    Have fun Guy! You may well get some heat resistant diffusion materials like Roscuo Hamburg, opal, tough silk, spun glass sheets..etc to soften the light. These boys are hard raw lights. If you want to use them as soft fill and don't have reflector, you can bounce the light on white board available from Art shops.

    You can also get bargain vintage fresnels occasionally. But you need to make sure they are electrically safe to use, no loose connections, properly earthed and no asbestos insulated wires. If they do have abestos insulation, you need to re-wire it. After it is not worth getting lung cancer in the name of Art and photography. Also vintage bulbs are a bit hard to find but i know a few e-bay dealers stock them.

    regarding a one-light shot of Loretta Young, i found this shot by Horst, which seems to have been taken with one light (to my untrained eye):

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0810...68#reader-link
    Yeah i love this photo. This was done with overhead light on boom arm.
    i plan on using the cinefoil as a sub for barn doors, until i can figure out which "real" photo lamps to use.
    Also get some wooden washing line pegs to rig the cine foil to the light. Don't use gaffer's tape as it may melt.

  2. #92
    Rolleiflexible's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by guy catelli View Post
    have you ever seen a shot taken with digital, then tranferred to silver-based film, and then optically printed in a wet lab on fibre-based b&w paper?
    Pssst ... Guy ... you being the new kid on the block, and I brung you here ... you just are not allowed to talk about stuff like that here. People get, um, cranky when you do. Moderators will banish you to Siberia or, worse yet, hybridphoto.com.

    Sanders

  3. #93
    RoBBo's Avatar
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    I've been shooting 11x14, 100 Speed film with strobes and have been getting great results from it.
    Though the lack of a shutter and a few other things were odd obstacles to overcome.
    I feel like all this talk about fresnels and feathering is unnecessary, I think you can quite easily get what you want with simply a large format camera, some strobes, and a bit of retouching. Maybe even without the retouching.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/falcon_...7600211157086/

  4. #94
    Christopher Nisperos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by singlo View Post
    Here are a few pics taken a few days ago in my "zoo cage studio"-well it is my tiny bedroom full of furnitures and lights; so cramped that the model stands a foot from the background and there is no room for hair lights. Working space here is 1.5m x 2.5m; madness isn't it? Can it get any worst? . . . PS photos taken with one to two fresnels or Dedo plus two Chimera as softlights. They were not intended to look like Hollywood style but I just played with the lights drawing inspirations from old hollywood photos. - Mr. Satan
    Really nice work, Singlo . . . even if they had been in a studio the size of an airplane hangar! All the more to your credit that you did such a good job in a tiny space.

    Shows that space ain't everything (depending upon format!!). Some of the most memorable portraits were created in small spaces. The great Phillipe Halsman's portrait of Marilyn Monroe comes to mind (http://imagecache2.allposters.com/im...e-Posters.jpg). OK, OK ... it's not the classical "Hollywood" look, but you get the point (in fact, your portraits have made the point!).

    One small criticism —and hopefully, a hint for improvement— regarding the tight headshot among your examples: there's a weird nose shadow on the left side of the pretty subject's face. Is it intentional? If not, perhaps it's a cross-shadow due to bad lateral position of your fill? I'm not sure. Anyway, wanted to bring it to your attention.

    Again, congratulations on your work.

    Christopher

  5. #95
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kino View Post
    Auteur theorists will no doubt rise in revolt, but I think like the Novelle Vague owed its revolutionary styles of production to a basic technical break-through in lightweight location equipment, so to did Hollwood Studio "styles" emerge in their fight to regain enough illumination to continue their film factory output.
    Just a little bit of chauvinism from me here, but the Nouvelle Vague owes a big deal to Michel Brault, a cinematographer and director from Québec, who worked for the NFB and collaborated with the Éclair company in France to develop the first shoulder-held 35mm camera. His style of "cinéma vérité" which he developped during his early documentary work at the NFB is the cornerstone of all the "authentic" style of the nouvelle vague fiction features.

    http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michel_Brault

    Of course, all of that would also be inconceivable without Kodak Tri-X and Ilford HPS !
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  6. #96
    RoBBo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by singlo View Post
    Just out of interest.....According to David Brooks(somewhat anti-Hurrell), old Hollywood masters used Kodak Tri-X ASA 320, the old film is red sensitive which is "favorable to skin tones, brilliant highlights, and soft contrast shadows" :

    http://forum.shutterbug.com/forum/sh...age=2#Post4845

    He noted:


    If you stick a light red filter (not deep red) on modern B&W panchromatic film, you can imitate the red sensitivity of old Kodak Tri-X right? Maybe not a good thing to do in practice because it darkens the viewfinder plus loss of light...also lightening the lip tone of women.
    This is close to what I've been doing, though I've been doing it directly on my sources, seems to have helped out quite a bit. Been using deep red actually.
    Dark Blue lipstick works best under this light.
    Costs me about a stop or more of power though. Kinda sucks.
    Tungsten lights are closer to that kind of light anyways though, I only do this because I'm using strobes and all that 'blue light' hitting my models was picking up tons of freckles and other nonsense that I didn't want to have anything to do with.

  7. #97

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    Quote Originally Posted by RoBBo View Post
    .... I'm using strobes and all that 'blue light' hitting my models was picking up tons of freckles and other nonsense that I didn't want to have anything to do with.
    why is it so difficult for so many Strobocops to grasp that the quality of strobe, especially on the human complexion, is not the same as tungsten?

  8. #98
    RoBBo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by guy catelli View Post
    why is it so difficult for so many Strobocops to grasp that the quality of strobe, especially on the human complexion, is not the same as tungsten?
    I really don't know, I actually got in an argument with one of my teachers about it who still thinks my filtering of the light sources was a waste of time (and of a stop of light).
    But there's really no question in my mind, looking at what I shot filtered and unfiltered, that I could not have done what I wanted to with straight strobes.
    The whole mess is really actually pretty simple, and you could see the effects perfectly with a roll of any pan film through a holga color splash, yet people still argue...

  9. #99
    Helen B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhv View Post
    Just a little bit of chauvinism from me here, but the Nouvelle Vague owes a big deal to Michel Brault, a cinematographer and director from Québec, who worked for the NFB and collaborated with the Éclair company in France to develop the first shoulder-held 35mm camera...
    Just a small point, but as far as I know (and I could be wrong) the camera he collaborated on with Jean-Pierre Beauviala was the legendary 16 mm NPR ('noiseless portable reflex'), first produced in about 1960. I still have one, by the way. You can see the cameras themselves in action in a few movies - the sighting I remember the best was in Themroc.

    Best,
    Helen

  10. #100
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Helen B View Post
    Just a small point, but as far as I know (and I could be wrong) the camera he collaborated on with Jean-Pierre Beauviala was the legendary 16 mm NPR ('noiseless portable reflex'), first produced in about 1960. I still have one, by the way. You can see the cameras themselves in action in a few movies - the sighting I remember the best was in Themroc.

    Best,
    Helen
    You might be right as I don't have the technical details, so perhaps the handheld 35mm was therefore a progeny of the original NPR.

    One extra point for "Les raquetteurs," an early film on which Brault worked depicting a snowshoe race: there's a great shot of a professional photographer setting up his Crown Graphic for a formal portrait of the winner. He is FAST setting up all the switches and lever!
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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