Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,840   Posts: 1,582,556   Online: 1030
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26
  1. #1
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,510
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    437

    high-output studio strobe power-packs

    I'm looking into my options for high-output studio flash units. I'm interested in which units are the most efficient, so that they really do put out something resembling what their watt-seconds suggest they do. For example, I know that the Speedotron BlackLine 48xx series has a guide number 50% higher than the 24xx series. Does anyone know where I can go to get this information consistently, to make an informed decision about lighting equipment? It seems like most manufacturers don't want to put out comparable information so you can't shop their equipment on meaningful comparisons.

  2. #2
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,483
    Images
    20
    In general, there isn't very much consistent information about this sort of thing across brands, and of course, Watt-seconds doesn't translate into guide numbers in any consistent way, since you have the factors of the efficiency of the head and the reflector or diffuser to consider, and these differ from one brand to another. Best to consider the Watt-seconds as a rough guide to the kinds of things you can do with one pack or another. You can generally assume that twice as much power in Watt-seconds will give you twice as much light from the same head made by the same manufacturer, just not from one manufacturer to another.

    I use Normans myself, but Speedotron BlackLine are reliable units. If I were buying new today, I'd probably be thinking Elinchrom. They are very efficient units that allow for a lot of control.

    Do you have a Calumet or similar place in DC where you can rent lighting and try out a few different systems?
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  3. #3
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,510
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    437
    In DC we have Penn Camera, which has Profoto (most likely out of my purchase budget), and Elinchrom, but they only have a lightweight Elinchrom outfit (1100 ws). They've also got Bowens, but their Bowens set isn't even as powerful as my existing Travelites. The nearest Calumet store to me is Philadelphia.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Westminster, Maryland, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,504
    So Scott why do you need the horse power.

    The best solution is to get heads designed for sports photography to get the most bang for the buck. These are more expensive, but worth it if you need maximum power with the shortest flash duration.

    Me, I simply own 6 Dyna-Liite power packs to pump up the volume when needed. Back in my day to USA Today we used Speedotrons with quad-sports heads to light an arena.

    Call me and let me know what you are planning to do with maxi power. Speedotrons are big and heavy.
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  5. #5
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,510
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    437
    I'm looking for the major horsepower to use in conjunction with shooting wetplate and/or daguerrotypes. Coating my own dry plates was bad enough- they're around ISO 1, and even with my 750ws monolights at full power, I was getting f4 or so. I would have had to do multiple pops to get to f8, considering the lens on the studio camera only goes to f5, and I didn't have enough depth of field on my still life.

    My other option would be to go with some high-output fluorescents to get the UV needed for the antique processes, so my subjects aren't trying to sit still for more than 30 seconds at a time.

  6. #6
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,483
    Images
    20
    That could complicate things. Studio strobes often have UV filtered tubes (to avoid problems like fluorescence with fabrics that contain certain brighteners), so you'll want to make sure that you have tubes that aren't UV filtered, and then you'll want to experiment to determine the Guide Number for a particular process.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Italia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,680
    IIRC Speedotron charges extra for UV coated bulbs. $10? I forget.

    Wouldn't multiple heads firing in the same direction work? I don't fully remember how light adds up but I think shooting two 2400ws heads at one target is similar to using one 4800ws head.

    OTOH if it's still life why not do multiple pops?

  8. #8
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,510
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    437
    Still life will be the exception, not the rule. I certainly can do multiple packs/heads together, it would just make for a more compact setup to have one unit rather than two or three.

  9. #9
    Jim Noel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,905
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    I'm looking for the major horsepower to use in conjunction with shooting wetplate and/or daguerrotypes. Coating my own dry plates was bad enough- they're around ISO 1, and even with my 750ws monolights at full power, I was getting f4 or so. I would have had to do multiple pops to get to f8, considering the lens on the studio camera only goes to f5, and I didn't have enough depth of field on my still life.

    My other option would be to go with some high-output fluorescents to get the UV needed for the antique processes, so my subjects aren't trying to sit still for more than 30 seconds at a time.
    Since you are looking for maximum power the only place to look is Broncolor. They have units which will put our much more true power than any other brand. They are expensive, but worth it.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Westminster, Maryland, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,504
    Why not a big, powerful HMI light? Yes your subject must sit for 10 to 15 seconds, but everyone had to do that in the 19th century.

    Don't forget to soften the light with a shoot through scrim.

    Broncolor makes such nice stuff that I can't afford.
    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin