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  1. #1
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Flash Contact Voltage Regulation

    Recently, I've acquired a Canon Elan EOS IIe - and I intend to hook this into the synch of my DynaLite MX1000 packs. After a great deal of research, I've found that the synch voltage of the Dynas is 10 volts, and there is some concern over whether the Canon is designed for, or will be affected by that much juice (incidentally, after shuffling my feet over a carpet on a dry day, it is not unusual to fire the DynaLite synch circuit via static electricity).
    The only advice I've been able to glean from the web is that the Canon's use with DynaLites is regarded as "Iffy".

    Wein has voltage regulators that will limit circuit voltage to 6 volts.

    Questions:

    Are the Wein regulators worth the money - to drop four (4) volts?

    Does anyone beside Wein make comparable regulators?

    Does anyone have any experience with these, or any other regulators?

    I have an idea that this will make a lively topic.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  2. #2

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    I have seen a few designs out on the web for a diy approach - its not too tricky if you're handy with a soldering iron.

    In your case it would be even easier as most are designed to take the ~200V that old flashes can have at the sync terminals...

  3. #3
    fotch's Avatar
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    The Wein is cheaper than replacing the camera. I use it on the later cameras with my old White Lightning coffee can studio strobes, which work great other than higher voltage than newer units.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  4. #4

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    With full electronic camera's, whether they use film or otherwise, you have be verry carefull as stated.
    If a 10V sync would hurt your camera ? I don't know and don't want to try it.

    You got a couple of choices: the Wien Safe Sync, or radio or IR sync.

    In any case: better be safe than sorry.........

    Peter

  5. #5
    Ed Sukach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by archphoto View Post
    You got a couple of choices: the Wien Safe Sync, or radio or IR sync.
    Hmm. One thing I did notice was that the contact voltage for IR synch devices was generally higher ~ 15 to 20V, or so. Not quite the same as a passive circuit completion, the immediate result was to fire a relatively powerful burst of IR - or radio frequency.

    Yes. I would be interested in a schematic. Back in the day, I was certified by NASA for soldering, reflow soldering and welding. I think I could still make my way.
    Carpe erratum!!

    Ed Sukach, FFP.

  6. #6

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    Thanks for that info, Ed..... !
    Never realized this, good to know.

    Peter

  7. #7
    AZLF's Avatar
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    I would suggest buying the Wein unit and going on about your business. That's what I did and I work with circuit board assembly almost every day. Your time (plus the parts) is worth a lot more than the $60.00 or so dollars the Wein unit costs. I know my time is. And yes, any voltage greater than 6 volts can damage the newer cameras. My Bogen mono lights have 80 volts at the sync point. My Sunpak 522's have 22 volts. The Wein unit handles it all without a problem.
    http://www.apug.org/gallery/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=10716
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  8. #8

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    I have some bookmarks on another computer which I'll look up for you - if you don't hear anything in a day or two pm me a reminder.

    I just googled and found this which is plausible enough (no guarantees - test it first!) but in your case (and only if you're sure the flash voltage doesn't go above 10V) you could just use two back to back 5V1 zener diodes in series with the sync cable to drop the voltage the camera sees to 10-5.1-0.7 = 4.3V...

  9. #9
    Ralph Javins's Avatar
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    Good morning, Ed;

    While we have had electronically controlled and fired flash circuits in our cameras for many years now, it took until 1992 for an internationally recognized ISO standard to be published. It specifies a maximum flash unit trigger circuit voltage of 24 VDC. Unfortunately, the camera manufacturers chose to interpret that specification literally, and many of them chose a lower level. For example, my Canon DSLR cameras do not want to see anything higher than 5 VDC applied to their camera flash control circuit inputs. This may be a case where there seems to have been some lack of communication between design teams in the two camps.

    Are the Wein SafeSync devices worth the money? Only if your camera objects strenuously to having a higher voltage applied to it. The cost of the camera parts alone is probably more than the Wein SafeSync. Then you add the $ 300 or so labor charge for the camera technician, and the Wein SafeSync begins to look even more reasonable.

    How do I know the current labor charges for electronics work in digital cameras? My main Canon is having its CF card socket replaced at this time. I have no idea how one of the pins was bent, and no clue whatever about where one of the other pins went. I have never had a problem like this when loading a roll of film into any of my cameras at any time in the past.
    Enjoy;

    Ralph Javins, Latte Land, Washington

    When they ask you; "How many Mega Pixels you got in your camera?"
    just tell them; "I use activated silver bromide crystals tor my image storage media."

  10. #10
    MattKing's Avatar
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    The last time I had someone work on my Mamiya TLRs and lenses was when I decided to have the entire kit and kaboodle checked, cleaned, Lubricated and adjusted (oh, I think they replaced a missing screw as well - not bad after up to 30 years of service!).

    The technician who helped me indicated they were getting a lot of work from people frying their newer cameras (mostly digital, but some film as well) by using slightly older flashes.

    We agreed that my old Bowens monolights and Metz 202s should only be used very carefully with anything created in the last 30 years.

    Matt

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