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  1. #11
    JimO's Avatar
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    they ain't AC

    i too, have a number of old flashes along the way - they are NOT for AC power - you may be very unhappy with the results of any time of connection to AC power!!!

    I have used the sockets though and soldered them into repair a broken connection on a modern flash - they are bigger, more solid and easier to solder in.

    connecting to AC power in any way is a no-no!

  2. #12
    olleorama's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    No. That is for an AC adapter. It is just like my Sunpak that I mentioned.

    I think a lot of the confusion is from the fact that mid-1980s is not generally what comes to mind when we hear the word "older"...especially in this crowd of many users of truly "older" cameras.
    Any bearing on voltage and other specs? I have a few sunpaks too, and they seem to have the same kind of socket. So, if I find an AC adapter with the same specs I could solder a fitting plug and fire away?

    Just a small side note; in my world an AC adapter and a battery eliminator are basically the same thing. Difference maybe in application.

  3. #13

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    The voltage requirement is likely the same as what the batteries would provide. If you can figure out the polarity, then there is no reason you couldn't cobble something up.
    Note that some flashes may not isolate the batteries from the eliminator terminals. So if you have non-rechargable batteries in it, you might want to remove them.

  4. #14
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by olleorama View Post
    Hmm, I'm talking mid-80s flashes here. And the socket is labeled 'AC' with two pins inside the somewhat rectangular hole. Of course no flash could take the 240 I got humming in my wall socket.
    Well, I have an old flash (can't remember the make at the moment but it's one with a gold coloured tube) which does have two pins and is intended to be powered by 240v AC. Mine is more mid 60s. If I can find it tomorrow, I will post a picture.


    Steve.
    Last edited by Steve Smith; 11-11-2009 at 05:24 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  5. #15
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    I have an old Braun Hobby EF300, circa 67 that has a recessed 2 pin connector, similar type of connector that goes to a bipost shutter sync terminal , but it is indeed a AC line socket.

    Adjacent to it is a turn switch to select 120 or 240. It will of a sort work like a battery eliminator, in that the oscillator will run without batteries, but the recycle time is something likel 6 minutes in this configuration. It is for strickly charging the batteries. I have fed it 4x 2V gelled lead acid cells, since the wet cells it was made for stopped production in the early 70's. I think I talked about the restoration in a long post here a couple of years ago.
    my real name, imagine that.

  6. #16
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    I have found mine. It's a Sunpak GT9 and it has a two pin connector at the top. Next to it is a switch marked AC and BATT. In the battery position it moves a piece of plastic over the AC in area. This woulds prevent it being switched to battery if a mains plug was inserted.

    There is a second switch to set the voltage. 100-120v in one position, 200-240v in the other.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  7. #17
    bsdunek's Avatar
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    My Honeywell Heiland model 65A 'potato masher' flash has two connectors.
    There is the one, that takes a plug that looks like a household plug, and has a PC connector on the other end. This goes to the camera PC socket, and is what triggers the flash. See the cord at the left in the picture below.
    The other connector is an oval recess with two pins. This takes a power cord that provides house current to the flash so it can be operated on 115/120 VAC, instead of the three 'C' cells.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails potato masher flash.bmp   PC cord.jpg  
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak just did!


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  8. #18
    AgX
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    What is a "battery eliminator"?
    I know thoughg, that there are electronic flashes that accept as an alternative to the standard low-voltage battery packs, `high´-voltage battery packs that feed the flash capacitor directly.

  9. #19
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    What is a "battery eliminator"?
    The clue is in the words! A device which eliminates the need for a battery. Or just a mains powered power supply which gives a low voltage output to power the flash (or anything else).


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  10. #20
    AgX
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    Here we call it a "mains device". Could mean anything too...

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