Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,219   Posts: 1,532,286   Online: 904
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24
  1. #1
    olleorama's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    526
    Images
    5

    AC sockets on older flashes

    I've noticed that many of my older flashes has an AC socket. Is this for alternating current battery eliminators, or something else?

    If they are, are there any standards for this type of socket? Could I solder up one myself? Try find a replacement for a twenty year old flash, it's not easy.

  2. #2
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,972
    Images
    65
    They were NOT for use with AC in any fashion. These are battery operated only even though the plug appears (and is) similar to an AC socket, the other end of the cord was a female two pin connector for a battery pack or other type of flash. I have several types of cords like this, and our local camera store still caries a few styles of replacement. I have the auxiliary units and slave flash units that take some of these odd cords. With many, the insulation is rotting.

    I never saw a battery eliminator as such back then. They did have big power supplies for studio use that these things could plug into. Usually though the studios didn't use flash bulbs, but they could accept the cords in the power units. Goodness, that goes back to the 40s.

    PE

  3. #3
    MikeSeb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Prospect (Louisville), KY, USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,062
    You sure it isn't a socket for a "household plug" flash-sync cord?
    Michael Sebastian
    Website | Blog

  4. #4
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    22,972
    Images
    65
    Well, that is what it must be Mike. The camera had a 2 pin plug on the lens/shutter and the other end of the household plug was a female version to fit the camera. There were also acessories for this that used similar cables. I have a box of flash units, lenses and cords for this type of unit. I have had to get an adaptor so that I can put a modern flash onto some of my old camera/lens combinations. They make them.

    PE

  5. #5
    MikeSeb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Prospect (Louisville), KY, USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,062
    Paramount Cords makes adapters for just about anything, to just about anything.
    Michael Sebastian
    Website | Blog

  6. #6
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,240
    Images
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by olleorama View Post
    I've noticed that many of my older flashes has an AC socket. Is this for alternating current battery eliminators, or something else?

    If they are, are there any standards for this type of socket? Could I solder up one myself? Try find a replacement for a twenty year old flash, it's not easy.
    By an "AC socket" do you mean a socket that looks like a AC wall socket you might plug your toaster into () or a socket that you could plug in an alternate source of power for the flash?

    If it is the former, it isn't for power at all - it is a "household" style connector for flash synch (as noted above).

    The latter type of socket isn't found very often now, but I recall having a small Braun flash that had a socket that you plugged one end of a proprietary cord into, with the other end plugged into the AC socket in the wall, for power.

    The "household" style synch cords were both good and bad - good because they provided a strong and simple contact, but bad because they could be mistaken for something that plugs into a wall.

    Matt

  7. #7
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,213
    Images
    20
    This is very likely an "H"-type sync cable, which looks like an ordinary household electrical cord, but DON'T PLUG IT INTO AN ELECTRICAL SOCKET. Shutters that had bipost sync terminals could be connected to a strobe that had an H-type sync socket using an ordinary electric shaver cord. Paramount, as Mike mentions, makes other kinds of connectors, so you can connect a camera or shutter with a PC contact to a strobe with H-type sync. This is only a sync cord; it doesn't power the flash.

    Older and some current strobe pack systems like Norman (also Norman portable strobes) use this kind of sync connector, but it's become less popular, due to the obvious safety concern that someone could make the mistake of plugging a camera or shutter into the wall, but an advantage of this system is that it works with ordinary electrical extension cords and power strips.

    There are also slave triggers that plug into H-type sockets.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  8. #8
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    Some flashes, such as my Sunpak 555, have an accessory adapter that allows the flash to be powered by AC. However, you cannot plug the flash straight into the wall. On your older flash, I think what you are seeing is just an old style synch socket of the kind used on Graflexes, Heilands, etc. It is the same thing as a two-pronged wall plug. It is simply another type of synch connector, NOT an AC connection.

    Cables with these ends came in various combinations. I have two-prong to two prong male and two-prong to two-prong female (to be used as an extension cable and/or for rigging multiple flashes together), two-prong to bi-post, and two-prong to PC. I am sure there were others as well.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  9. #9
    olleorama's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    526
    Images
    5
    Hmm, I'm talking mid-80s flashes here. And the socket is labeled 'AC' with two pins inside the somewhat rectangular hole. Of course no flash could take the 240 I got humming in my wall socket.

    So, the consesus is that this is for sync and not power?

    I have also seen the hammerhead flashes that has sockets for battery eliminators, and I thought that these could be the same on my lame auto flashes. And it would kind of make sense since there's a tab connected to the battery on/off-switch which partially blocks the socket when set on 'on', and I thought it could be to prevent using to power sources. Well then, my plans for powering my armada of lame-o flashes indoors seems here by be put on ice.

  10. #10
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    No. That is for an AC adapter. It is just like my Sunpak that I mentioned.

    I think a lot of the confusion is from the fact that mid-1980s is not generally what comes to mind when we hear the word "older"...especially in this crowd of many users of truly "older" cameras.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin