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  1. #1
    joe7's Avatar
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    Pls suggest a good light meter to me!!!

    i'm shooting mostly potrait,street photog,night photo,urban landscape..
    what is the good light meter that suits my need?i'm looking for a used one from ebay,my budget is around $200~230 or lower.

    the light meter must:-

    1)robust,can stand a lot of abuse.

    2)can take average of few reading...let say i took the reading of people and their background,and the meter will calculate the average both of the reading automatically.

    3)have spot metering..well,i'm not sure whether i really need this,but pls suggest.

    4)etc..pls suggest anything,regarding to the light meter,i'm still a newbie with zero knowledge, planning to invest in a good used light meter..
    thanks in advance
    Last edited by joe7; 12-20-2009 at 11:19 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by joe7 View Post
    i'm shooting mostly potrait,street photog,night photo,urban landscape..
    what is the good light meter that suits my need?i'm looking for a used one from ebay,my budget is around $200~230 or lower.

    the light meter must:-

    1)robust,can stand a lot of abuse.

    2)can take average of few reading...let say i took the reading of people and their background,and the meter will calculate the average both of the reading automatically.

    3)have spot metering..well,i'm not sure whether i really need this,but pls suggest.

    4)etc..pls suggest anything,regarding to the light meter,i'm still a newbie with zero knowledge, planning to invest in a good used light meter..
    thanks in advance
    I answered this post to kick it along, as I'm quite interested in any responses myself.

    However, I do own a few meters and can make some comments on my own account.

    First: none of mine are really robust -none of them will withstand a fall onto concrete or bitumen (as I found out with one whose lanyard came undone at a bad moment )

    Second: I have found "spot-meters" generally more useful, so I would suggest you go for a spot-meter. However, as with any meter, they need to be used "intelligently".Third: Don't worry too much about so-called "averaging". This is a bit of a "scam": you don't really need it, and once you get the hang of metering, you probably won't even use it. Read up on the Zone System, and you will see that all you really need to do is decide which "zone" your metered spot should fall in, meter it, adjust your exposure (this is where the "intelligent" use comes in), and take your shot. That is, you really only need to take one and only one meter reading to get a good exposure (unless, of course you are going the whole Zone System hog, including selective development of the negative and printing etc. as well). In most instances, the exposure latitude of your film will -more or less- take care of the rest of the scene (as long as your brightness range isn't too excessive).

    Finally, spot meters tend to be rarer and more expensive than other varieties.

    OK, now someone else's turn!

    PS: this thread may be helpful:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum216/...5mm-zoner.html

    and this one: http://www.apug.org/forums/forum48/5...t-meter-2.html
    Last edited by Galah; 12-21-2009 at 10:03 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #3
    BradS's Avatar
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    1) you don't need a spotmeter...especially given the situations you describe....

    2) no light meter that I am aware of is really very rugged. None can be expected to work properly after being dropped, or dunked....etc.

    3) Something small that fits in your pocket will probably be best - given the useage scenarios you mentioned.

    4) I suggest, Gossen Luna Pro Digital, Luna Pro digital F or Digi-flash. The Sekonic L-208 might also fit the bill.

  4. #4

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    google SHEPERD DM170, another worth looking at , does all you want and is always cheaper than any gossen/sekonic. well made , quite robust but not a big seller due to poor marketing i suspect. Runs off a 9volt alkaline. I got one a few months ago and i`m quite happy with it, regards

  5. #5

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    Something like the Sekonic L-558 (one just sold for $230 on LF Forum), will give you reflected, incident, spot and averaging functions. But I wouldn't want to test its ruggedness (not that it's any worse than other digital meters). And unless you use it regularly, the many buttons and functions may wind up confusing you when you need to take a reading quickly.
    I'd suggest you start out simply. The Sekonic L-208, Gossen DigiFlash Brad suggested are worth checking out. For simplicity, capability and ease/speed of use, and relatively cheap, it would be hard to go wrong with an older Luna-Pro or Luna-Pro SBC: inexpensive spot attachment (15 and 7.5 degrees) available, offers reflected and incident metering.

  6. #6

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    I'm a fan of the minolta Spotmeter F / M. (F being the version with a flashmeter, M without) It's got an averaging function where you point it at the darkest and lightest spots in the scene, and it gives you the proper exposure based on that.

  7. #7
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    Olympus OM 3, 3T, 4 or 4T. Oh, the meters also come with a camera body which uses the superb Zuiko lenses. I know this sounds like a wise a## answer, however given how you want the meter to work, that might be a good solution. You didn't mention what kind of camera you are using. I use a Pentax digital spot meter for some stuff, an old and cheap Gossen Pilot for others, sunny 16 sometimes and the built in meter of my camera for others. With a little patience you could probably get an OM 4 or maybe even a 4T with a 50mm lens for the dollars you want to spend. Bill Barber

  8. #8
    MattKing's Avatar
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    My Gossen Profisix (Luna-Pro SBC in the USA) has withstood decades of use and provided accurate results throughout. It is easy to use, and very sensitive. I have and use the flash meter attachment for it - there is a similar model (the Luna-Pro F) with built in flash metering.

    My only concern with my Profisix is that it is slightly bulky. As a result, I bought a little brother for it - a Gossen Digiflash. It is very small, and compactness can be very valuable too.

    Matt

  9. #9
    AlexG's Avatar
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    The Sekonic L-308 does everything!

    Incident, reflective, and even flash. I've been using mine for years and is extremely durable. I've dropped it many times and it still works like it did on day 1.

    http://www.sekonic.com/products/Seko...0FLASHMATE.asp

    And its only about 190$


    Alex

  10. #10

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    Hi all..
    I hope the following site would serve your purpose...
    Good luck..!

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