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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by kadath View Post
    I could use diffusion, but I still don't get how that will reduce the light on an automatic flash. If I reduced the light by two stops say, won't the flash compensate by shooting until it reads the full light value?
    Reducing the light itself (via ND or diffusion) doesn't change the light output as controlled by the auto sensor. As you say, the sensor will compensate by allowing the flash tube to deliver more light.

    Directing more light directly to the sensor will "fool" it into thinking the subject has enough light and will cause the flash tube to deliver less light.

    Changing the ISO will also "fool" the sensor into thinking the subject has enough light for the film speed it "thinks" you're using. This, as you suggest, only works if you can dial in a faster ISO than the film you're actually using.


    I took a quick look and all my really small flashes do max out at 400 on the dial. My Vivitar 3500 does go up to 800.

  2. #12
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Changing the ISO on an automatic flash doesn't have any effect on the light output. All it does is change the aperture that the flash tells the photographer to set on the camera.

    If the auto flash has more than one range (eg a "Red" range, a "Blue" range and a "Yellow" range) than the choice of range will affect the light output. If you choose the range that suggests the largest aperture, but shoot at a smaller aperture, you will get less light output than would normally be needed for full illumination.

    A heavily diffused and bounced flash on manual is probably the best bet - with a flash meter.

    Matt

  3. #13
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    There is no point in using a fully automatic flash for fill light, unless is can be specifically set to do such. The flash exposure will always be wrong unless it is controlled manually, or with an auto fill light setting.

    You are better off with a hot lamp filtered to match the main light if all you have is an automatic flash.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  4. #14

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    Although the Vivitar ISO maxes out at 400, if you have the VP-1 for the 283 you can still reduce the output by 5 f-stops.
    The 285 has the VP module built in.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  5. #15

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    I've just found information on the leica sf24d, which seems like the most versatile flash I've seen, with all apertures from f2-11, ISO 25-800 and +/-3 f-stops, all in automatic mode. Anyone used this? I was considering selling some of my old canon eos stuff, so I might be able to afford it 2nd hand.

  6. #16
    Denis R's Avatar
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    flash

    you said the C-word, I'll say the N-word

    1. Nikon SB-11 ISO 25 - 800 f 2 - 32 max power gn 120 @ iso 100
    max power only in manual, adjustable power in auto. with sensor unit su-2

    2. Sunpak 522 ISO 25 - 1600 f 2.8 - 22 max power gn 120 @ iso 100
    max power to 1/64 in manual, adjustable in auto.

    both are handle mount bouncers

    seems it's easier to get less light from a large flash unit than more from a small one
    Kodak Duaflex II with kodet lens
    N75 N8008s D60
    Yashica - D
    Only a photographer knows the true value of infinity

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