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  1. #1
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    What CFL color temp for B&W film?

    I want to set up some cheap lighting just for shooting product-shot-type stuff in my house. I went to buy some CFL lights and they offered 3 color temperatures..."warm" 2700k, "medium" 4200k, and "cool" 5000k. For black-and-white film, I suppose it doesn't matter much, but was wondering if anyone had a preference.
    f/22 and be there.

  2. #2
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    5000K...unless, of course, you want 4200K or 2700K.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  3. #3
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    Actually I think I changed my mind on the CFLs anyway. High-output ones are bigger than their incandescent equivalents, and will stick out of the lamp I have. I think I will just use a 200W incandescent and wear gloves.
    f/22 and be there.

  4. #4
    E76
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    I would imagine using a CFL with a color temperature closer to tungsten (3200K) than daylight (5500K) would require a slight increase in exposure just like using a regular tungsten bulb would. In that case, go with the "cool" lamps.

  5. #5
    Rick A's Avatar
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    I have a set with "daylight" corrected lamps they work well for color

    Rick

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    Incandescents are the way to go. CFLs are perilous. They're low power, take forever to turn on, and present risk of mercury poisoning if broken.
    --Nicholas Andre

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by tiberiustibz View Post
    Incandescents are the way to go. CFLs are perilous. They're low power, take forever to turn on, and present risk of mercury poisoning if broken.
    Just a minor rant. The marketing pitch is how great the CFL's are with NO MENTION of the downsides. See above^. What I used to toss in the garbage
    I've got to recycle at the hardware store or other recycler & still haven't gotten the X,000 hours of life advertised.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  8. #8
    olleorama's Avatar
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    what 'temperature' does a halogen lamp have? I can get quite cheap halogen lamps here.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by olleorama View Post
    what 'temperature' does a halogen lamp have? I can get quite cheap halogen lamps here.
    You can check the specs of many halogen bulbs on "dons bulbs"

    From my experience, generic bulbs that don't indicate the color temp are dim or yellow (low K).

  10. #10

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    5000 Kelvin is considered shadowless daylight. I don't know how color film will react ie if some filtration is needed. The distance from the subject and the type of lens if any over the light fixture also can be an issue. You have to consider both the color temperature and the amount of light with color film. Home Depot sells 5000k tubes and they are not expensive. They should work fine with B&W fine and you can use them in regular fluorescent fixtures.

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