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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by mesh View Post
    Thanks Daniel... Say you ambient metered a person @ 125th, f8 but their face were in shadow. How would you approach flash without a meter?

    I've been fluky and just running the flash at the correct distance for that f-stop, and then reducing camera exposure by a stop. Very unscientific and only working because of the latitude of film ;-) Calculating the 'two' exposures and properly averaging is doing my head in! Of course hen the flash is the primary light source it's easy.
    Good heavens! Are we shooting at midday? Sounds like horrific falloff indeed. I would probably throw a tantrum, yell at everybody about how I just refuse to work 'candidly' in such light and storm off. :o

    After sulking back 5 minutes later I would probably key up ambient at f/5.6 250th rather than f/8 125th (because I like to live on the dof edge and because I tend to be a bit 'loose' in handling the RB so as long as I carry the eyes I like going to 250th - of course this is dependent upon the event and/or client expectations etc etc etc).

    Now I whip out the Vivitar set ISO to box (or whatever EI floats my boat). Next I decide on my ideal distance to subject (maybe I can get close maybe I cant, maybe I want to get close maybe I dont). I then use the Vivitar scale (built in) to set my flash strength to match the aperture one stop wider than my ambient and in line with my preferred distance from my subject (i.e I am standing further away from my subject and only looking to 'kiss' some light into the scene as lets face it the flash is coming very close to 'on axis'.). If I run out of plausible options shifting power I will fiddle around with my EI to get me closer to the distance to subject range I want to play in. (Edit: Reading this back I am not convinced I have explained this well at all...)

    From here I can just shuffle forward and back from my subject to dial in the degree of fill. I might just spend five minutes with my polaroid back and go 'bang,bang,bang' to nail down a safety zone of distance to subject that can render acceptable fill (whatever you define that to be on a personal level).

    As you can probably tell by now I subscribe more to the 'Use the Jedi Force Luke' method rather than the 'Lets try and pretend we are back in the Studio' method. If your head is 'vexed' mathematically then you are not likely to be in the best head space for creative freedom.

    I think David White's post is excellent.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    How do you do rear curtain sync on a camera with leaf shutter lenses?
    Steve.
    I find the RB's leaf shutter to be very loud. This is useful. I operate the Vivitar285 on the RB67 Deluxe Flash Trigger. This allows me to use my index finger to trigger the shutter and quickly move my index finger up and around the base of the Vivitar flash (which is mounted directly above the shutter trigger button). At the base of the Vivitar is a small button to manually trigger the flash.

    So essentially I disconnect the flash and learn to listen to my leaf shutter on the RB. Personally I find it very simple to drag the shutter through for a second of so and then pop my disco light as the leaf closes.

    Its not scientific but it is rear curtain.

  3. #13
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    I would consider looking up the Metz Mecamat remote flash sensor, particularly if you have a yen to introduce more than one flash to light the scene. When there is more than one flash source life is much simpler if they are all set to manual.

    Yes they are rare. I am pretty sure they work on a 45, since it uses the same camera interface socket as the 60 series. I recently bought one for my trustly old 60CT1. It lets me use modifiers that otherwise cover the auto sensor eye on the flash handle. It also gives me a ton of predicitable manual controlled dial down of flash outputs.
    my real name, imagine that.

  4. #14
    cdowell's Avatar
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    I, too, think David White's post is excellent. I took a class dedicated to flash and soon gave up my super-computerized Nikon flash for a semi-computerized cheap flash that didn't try to talk to my camera. It was more workable for me in my preferred manual modes. Any camera with a x-sync and I'm ready to go.

    Of course, once I bit the bullet and bought a flash meter, that changed everything, too. And for the better. It was really expensive for me at the time, but I can't imagine living without it. Particularly since it allowed me to move easily to off-camera flash.
    "To a photographer the world consists of an infinite number of vantage points -- places to stand -- of which very few are altogether satisfactory." (John Szarkowski, Atget)

    My flickr

  5. #15
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    So essentially I disconnect the flash and learn to listen to my leaf shutter on the RB. Personally I find it very simple to drag the shutter through for a second of so and then pop my disco light as the leaf closes.
    Sounds like you could use B if you wanted, with a little practice. Great technique.
    f/22 and be there.

  6. #16

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    I dislike automated flash functions and prefer not to use them - my up to date Nikon digi kit (sorry, I said it) is extremely inconsistent and unreliable on auto - even shooting digi, I prefer to do it the old fashioned way and set the gun to manual.

    With a 'blad or Mamiya, I like an older style Metz with simple manual settings (M, M/4, M/4), as you suggest, coupled with a decent bracket. I've worked with Vivitar 283's and they're nice reliable units, great for 35mm, but they feel a bit flimsy when attached to a heavy MF camera ; unlike with a Metz, where you've got a nice sturdy combination that can tolerate being picked up by the flash unit alone.

    With experience you can learn to guesstimate manual flash settings or, if you prefer, use the flash's own metering, which, in my opinion, is more consistent than TTL. However, if you really want to be in control, replace your current ambient meter with a Sekonic 308, which is a really nice little meter. This will allow you to take separate ambient and flash readings and put you right in the driving seat.

    Regards
    Jerry

  7. #17
    wclark5179's Avatar
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    Photography is painting with light. I work at finding/making controlled light. If I make pictures outdoors during mid-day I look for cover! Under a tree, in a garage, an entry, anywhere I find I can use light to make beautiful pictures of people. You create the illusion of three dimensions in the two we have to work with in photography by sculpting light and shadows.

    I use off-camera flash for about 95% of my photography.

    My coach and mentor was a gentleman named Monte Zucker. Clay Blackmore actually worked for Monte for a number of years. Maybe check out his work using Google search.

    Here is a sample of videos by Clay:

    http://www.youtube.com/results?searc...rch_type=&aq=f

    Play this one:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aGUJoMgZO84
    Bill Clark

  8. #18

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    I use a method like David's also using Vivitar 283 units.
    Ttl is fine if you're not mixing/matching flash units but if you do use ttl you would need to use the same brand or compatible flash units.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  9. #19
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David William White View Post

    ...

    Fill flash is done according to taste as others suggested, but the flash unit should have your aperture and film speed correctly dialed in as a start. If you wish to take the fill down a notch, just up the ISO on the flash unit by a third of a stop. For example, if the flash unit has 100 iso dialed in, then set it to 125 iso -- on the flash unit only. This tricks the thyristor on the flash unit into thinking it doesn't need as much light on the subject. If you take the fill down much further, you'll wonder where the fill went. Beyond the fill portion, you use the shutter speed to adjust the exposure of the ambient portion of the lighting.
    Be careful about this part of this otherwise excellent advice.

    For most auto flashes, adjusting the ISO on a slider or dial has no effect on the flash itself. All it does is tell the photographer to use a different aperture in order to obtain well exposed photos. So, for example, if you have a flash that recommends f/5.6 for correct exposure using one of it's auto ranges, you can leave the flash set that way, but set f/8.0 on your camera, and benefit from a one stop reduction in fill.

    There are some flashes that set the aperture on your camera. If you have one of those, then David's description may apply. As I've never worked with one of those flash and camera combinations, I don't know.

    Matt

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    Sounds like you could use B if you wanted, with a little practice. Great technique.
    Correct. You can use your left index finger to open the shutter and trigger flash and your right hand thumb taking up the tension on the cocking lever to close down the bulb exposure. After a bit of practice you can nail it.

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