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  1. #1

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    lighting for volume shooting-hotel rooms

    I am old school, non invasive, lighting for beauty. Traveled the world on fine art book projects of a few different types, underground historical sites, interiors and staged images with models. That work was done with traditional strobe and mixed lighting sources. Very heavy and time consuming.
    I am now faced with the challenge of keeping the quality and sort of unlit-lit look and doing so under tight deadlines, budgets and stiff competition and possibly working by my 57 year old self.
    There once was something called hosemaster lighting system, I believe.
    I have not been able to find anything on the web about it.
    I thought it might offer mobility, speed and versatility when working alone.
    Does anyone have any suggestions?
    If you find the time to visit my site at photomax.weebly.com you will better understand my approach.
    This is my first post. My e-mail is photomaxrichardson@gmail.com
    I appreciate your help.

  2. #2
    SIB
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    Hello Max,

    I haven't used the Hosemaster, but it is only really good for small set-ups since the light head is also small.
    I was a professional photo teacher, and used to substitute small flash and flashlights for the Hosemaster. You can add CC filters or colour-conversion filters over the flash or flash head to colour balance these lights with the ambient light.
    I taught this BDE (before the digital era), so it is easier now since you can see the results right away.
    If you go digital, there is a technique (its' name escapes me now) that allows you to shoot (on a tripod) multiple exposures (same f-stop, only shutter speeds change), whereby you can then import the images into Photoshop, and then blend the best of the highlights and shadows to enhance the final image.

    I hope this helps,

    Stacey Bindman
    Montreal,Quebec

  3. #3
    CBG
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    So, are you shooting the hotel rooms themselves or in hotel rooms? What is your subject matter?

  4. #4
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    the video's a little old, but still very usable techniques

    from the "lighting master" dean collins, from a talk he did at Brooks Institute back in the early 90's

    part 1

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7OfzlIxzU7A

    part 2

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekRet4v2LR8

    part 3

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XvCnxs95--s

    -Dan

  5. #5
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIB View Post
    Hello Max,

    I haven't used the Hosemaster, but it is only really good for small set-ups since the light head is also small.
    I was a professional photo teacher, and used to substitute small flash and flashlights for the Hosemaster. You can add CC filters or colour-conversion filters over the flash or flash head to colour balance these lights with the ambient light.
    I taught this BDE (before the digital era), so it is easier now since you can see the results right away.
    If you go digital, there is a technique (its' name escapes me now) that allows you to shoot (on a tripod) multiple exposures (same f-stop, only shutter speeds change), whereby you can then import the images into Photoshop, and then blend the best of the highlights and shadows to enhance the final image.

    I hope this helps,

    Stacey Bindman
    Montreal,Quebec
    Stacey-

    what you're talking about is called HDR (high dynamic range). In the best execution, it works very well, but a significant portion of HDR work I've seen looks extremely artificial and unnatural.

    For portable light that can be used on an interior, look into the Quantum Q-flash setups- I think they still make a bare-bulb head option for it.



 

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