Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,954   Posts: 1,522,780   Online: 968
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    173
    Quote Originally Posted by viridari View Post
    There is nothing useful on the display in terms of a calculator. [...] The guide number is not posted anywhere to indicate to you what these power levels really mean.
    Thanks viridari, that was a useful answer. That disqualifies that Canon flash for me since there are other that will be much easier to use and not get in my way, for just 1/5 of the price. Or that Vivitar 285HV you suggested looks promising, but it would be nice with a flash that can do all the TTL-stuff and still be a good choise for any old mechanical camera. Does such flash exist, for any money? (money is not an object)

    Hehe, i bet Canon put all those "features" there to make it easier to use... hilarious. But i guess i could set it on full power and improve the flash by taping a cheat-table over its display.. yea, that was irony.

    Are there anyone who perhaps know anything about the Seagull SG-300A? That flash also have auto modes, with its own metering for quick without-thinking shots, and it is very chep, just a little more than 1/10 of the 430 EX price.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    NJ
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,009
    Images
    3
    Can you use a Vivitar 285 on a modern camera? I have an ancient 283 which I use on my A-1, but I've been told not to use it on the EOS bodies due to the high voltage (which I measured) on the flash.

    Dan

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    35
    Quote Originally Posted by Fotoguy20d View Post
    I have an ancient 283 which I use on my A-1, but I've been told not to use it on the EOS bodies due to the high voltage (which I measured) on the flash.

    Dan
    Yes, older flashes trigger with something like 300V. New flashes push back about 5V. 300V into a hot shoe wanting 5V will do some damage.

    Wein makes something called a safe sync which steps down the voltage to a safe voltage for most modern cameras.

    However, some of the 285s were/are made with the lower voltage. I don't know how to tell the difference without a multimeter though

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    173
    The voltage issue.. As i mentioned when starting this thread, i had an old Sunpak 130. In the eighties i bought it together with a Chinon CE-4 (still have the CE-4 and use it almost every day), and later i bought a cheap EOS 5000, then EOS 300, then the first digital EOS 300D, then a 400D. One time i borrowed it to a friend with a Nikon too. After a year or so with the 300D i read on the net about that voltage issue.. My flash did put out a whopping 250 volts, but since i used it on all those EOS bodies over the years, and today it has been 7 years on DSLR without the slightest issue, why even bother?
    Last edited by steelneck; 03-25-2010 at 04:46 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Iowa
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,034
    The voltage "warnings" people often tout aren't the whole story. The real number you need is power, which is voltage times current. if you put 5v in a circuit with 1 ohm resistance you get 5amps of current. 5amps times 5v = 25watts of power. Likewise, if you put 300v in a circuit with 1 ohm resistance you get 300amps, which means 90000watts of power. If a flash actually was putting that much power through ANY electronic circuit it would melt. The current simply isn't as high for the high-voltage flashes.
    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

  6. #16
    viridari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina [USA]
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    330
    Images
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by Fotoguy20d View Post
    Can you use a Vivitar 285 on a modern camera? I have an ancient 283 which I use on my A-1, but I've been told not to use it on the EOS bodies due to the high voltage (which I measured) on the flash.

    Dan
    The newer 285HV model has a low voltage sync that is compatible with newer cameras. I've used mine with the digital toys safely but primarily use it on Mamiya TLR gear.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    NJ
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,009
    Images
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfeye View Post
    The voltage "warnings" people often tout aren't the whole story.
    Yes and no. Your point about power is well taken, but voltage could be an issue. To save on size, discrete components typically will be rated for the maximum voltage (with perhaps some margin) they should see. So, if a modern flash needs 6V, those devices in your camera might only be rated for 10V or 25V or maybe 50V. 250V across them will cause them to fail, if not immediately then over time.

    Dan

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    173
    Did some searching.. The Sigma EF-530 DG Super seem to be a competent flash. From what i just read, i can set iso, zoom, aperture and a distance that the flash adjusts its output to (called distance priority). Or set its power and it calculates the correct distance in the display according to set aperture/iso/zoom.

    This flash is also compatible with Canon high speed sync so it can be used at any shutterspeed on new EOS cameras. Now i am close to order one..

    Anyone with hands on experience with this flash on old mechanical cameras?

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Montgomery, Il/USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,003
    New flash, old camera=no problem.
    The old camera simply doesn't see all the new gee-gaws on the shoe, it only uses the center contact.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    173
    I ended up buying the Seagull 300A. So far it seem to be working good, its built in metering in the auto-modes seem to be correct and it does what it should, it also have a good ol GN-table at its back, but i sure miss my old Sunpak that was both a lot smaller and more powerful. The Seagull flash have zoom and its guide number 30, it is of course measured at max zoom (105mm), at the wide 28mm position its GN is 22, my old Sunpak did not have zoom and that had a GN of 30 and was good down to 28mm. The head of the Seagull turns 270 degrees and tilts 90, so it can be pointed backwards over my head to bounce above/behind. Voltage? No idea, but my digital EOS do not complain.. Price? A bargain, 45€ or about 61$

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin