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  1. #11

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    last time I checked the dryfit was a type of lead acid

    Gelled or something? Regardless, very old and heavy tech. Id go with LiFePO4 and a PCB but I cant afford that!

    Now how can I use the speedlight with something like buff's retro laser?
    Last edited by kawasakiguy37; 12-06-2010 at 12:47 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #12
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    I believe the input voltage for a CT1/2 head is about 450V. There is a third contact wire that I think is used to quench the flash capacitor dump in the pack after enough light is sensed by the head. It allows a faster recycle. The flash capacitor is in the pack, not the head on a Metz CT60

    The dryfit sold for the ct60 pack is a speciallized contact type of Absorbed Glass Mat lead acid battery. Non speciallized AGM batteries are easier for me to find, and cost half as much, and recycle just fine.

    I use conventional UPS style AGM batteries with theterminal tabs bent back in themselves to put the contact in the right place to meet the pack's contact fingers. I had to shave a couple of spacer ribs out of the bottom of the pack to let the somewhat taller battery fit. Be sure to write on the correct side of the battery so you don't put it in backwards.

    I have used a 5V comupter p/s connected to the chassis of a dead dryfit to use this CT60 pack in the studio with no batteries. It worked quite well. Others from my past posting here on Metx CT60's have adapted golf cart batteries to feed their packs, and report they work fine as well.
    my real name, imagine that.

  3. #13
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Wilde View Post
    I believe the input voltage for a CT1/2 head is about 450V. There is a third contact wire that I think is used to quench the flash capacitor dump in the pack after enough light is sensed by the head.
    If you are referring to the wires actually at the flash tube, the third wire is the trigger which connects to the trigger transformer.

    The transformer gives a very short pulse of very high voltage which ionises the Xenon gas in the tube and starts it conducting.

    Unless stopped, the tube will continue conducting until the high voltage capacitor is discharged. A pair of thyristors is used by the light sensing circuit to stop the tube from conducting once enough light is received.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  4. #14

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    All Metz 60CT (CT1, CT2 and CT4) use the same battery pack. The battery pack uses either a 6V lead acid dry cell or 6V NiCad. It converts the 6V to about 360V DC to charge the capacitor which is in the head(That's what I measured) as well as supplying 6VDC to the control electronic in the head. The cable has 3 pins. You can try to build one but all I can say is good luck. Let me know what you ended up doing.

  5. #15

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    Looks like Im gonna whole sets and replace the batteries. I can save about 1.5 pounds by using a good NiMh cell. Unfortunately they are sorta expensive. Im looking into using a midline cell right now which will have enough current for faster recharge but not be too crappy. If anyone knows of a good value in C through D (Im thinking Sub-C size is best) NiMh cells I'd really appreciate it

  6. #16
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    Capacitoir - in the pack

    Quote Originally Posted by Chan Tran View Post
    All Metz 60CT (CT1, CT2 and CT4) use the same battery pack. The battery pack uses either a 6V lead acid dry cell or 6V NiCad. It converts the 6V to about 360V DC to charge the capacitor which is in the head(That's what I measured) as well as supplying 6VDC to the control electronic in the head. The cable has 3 pins.
    Chan - the main capacitor is in the pack on CT1/2, and my CT1 pack has a switch in the battery compartment for nicad, agm and wet cells (yes, they once had wet cells for this flash). The head has the control electronics. I have had both apart to rehab different parts.
    my real name, imagine that.

  7. #17

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    Metz informed me the switch doesnt change the voltage - so why is it there? They said that either way your supposed to use a 6v nicad or a 6v dryfit.

    In the end this will just save me money building Nimh packs :-)

    But which setting to use? Does it have to do with recycle? I wonder what the wet cell setting is....

  8. #18
    MattKing's Avatar
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    When the CT1 was first introduced, there were still lots of 402 and 202 units around. Many of those had wet cell lead acid batteries in them. The battery packs for the original CT1s were designed to make it easy for photographers to switch over from 202s or 402s - they included the switch to permit using those wet cells.

    Later versions of the CT1s and the CT-2 came with a battery pack that only had two positions for the switch - dryfit and nicad.

    Is there anyone else here who remembers using an eye dropper and a bottle of distilled water to help maintain a healthy battery for their Metz flash?

    At the very least I would expect that the internal resistance of the various battery types would differ - maybe the switch position takes that into account.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #19
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    My bet is that the switch setting is related to the slightly different charging regime that the different battery technologies use to end up feeding out nominal 6V on discharge. Nicad I think I recall liked constant current on charge, while lead acid liked constant voltage, with slight voltage differences between wet cels and AGM construction.
    my real name, imagine that.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by kawasakiguy37 View Post
    Looks like Im gonna whole sets and replace the batteries. I can save about 1.5 pounds by using a good NiMh cell. Unfortunately they are sorta expensive. Im looking into using a midline cell right now which will have enough current for faster recharge but not be too crappy. If anyone knows of a good value in C through D (Im thinking Sub-C size is best) NiMh cells I'd really appreciate it
    I just rebuilt my E36RE with batteries from zbattery. The ten AAA NiMh cells were about a buck a piece.

    Here is a D size NiMH for about $5 http://www.zbattery.com/NiMH-C-Cell-...h-1-2V-Battery

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