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  1. #11

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    Both.... I'd start assuming the landscape (far or near) is lit similarly to a location as far as I can get to (sometimes right where I am standing). Take an incident reading. Locate an important shadow. Take a spot reading. Locate a highlight I'd like to preserve. Take a spot reading.

    Consider the first two to set my exposure.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by atlcruiser View Post
    You have a great point but I dissagree 100%
    I'd expected some/many would disagree.... This is what works for me... When I first purchased my L758, I was disappointed that it didn't do all 3. In actual use, I never miss the reflected non-spot. For me, if I had to miss one, this would be the mode.

    Strange product packaging though.... Sekonic could easily have provided non-spot as well if they made the dome removable and satisfied everybody.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  3. #13
    CGW
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    Quote Originally Posted by atlcruiser View Post
    You have a great point but I dissagree 100%
    My only issue with the L558 is that it is a spot reflective meter only. I would like to have a non spot refective as well. I meter many different ways depending on the camera/film/subject etc.....

    I almost went for the L758 but what I really needed was a spot meter as I have other handheld area meters. Now I sort of wished I went for the 758 with both spot and area reflective meters!
    Huh? The 558/758 meters read 1 degree reflected spot. If you want wide area reflected readings(and why escapes me), just take multiple spot readings, save them, then hit the average button.

  4. #14
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stradibarrius View Post
    If you meter a wide landscape what mode do you use?
    I also use a L-758DR and for 95% of my metering with B&W or color I use the incident function. Occasionally I use the spot meter, and that works fine for general landscape of wide areas by comparing the readings from different spots.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

    Did millions of people suddenly disappear? This may have an answer.

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  5. #15
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    To use the incident meter for landscapes...do you just hold the meter up and take a reading? I have always pointed the reflective meter at the "landscape view" and took a reading. Have i been doing it wrong?
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
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  6. #16

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    You can do it either way, reflective or incident. Neither is wrong.

    IF you point your averaging reflective meter like that, you are making several assumptions. That is - the area where your sensor covers is 18% reflective and your camera lens sees about the same area as your landscape - or, there are no overly bright spot or deep shadow outside of the difference. If these assumption is not correct, then you have to make adjustment accordingly.

    I'd do it this way:

    Let's say you are standing at south rim of the Grand Canyon taking a picture of north rim. You have an incident meter. You can't possibly go to the other side and take a reading. What you do is, visually inspect the area you are standing and the subject (the north rim) and see if there are any reason why light falling at your location and the other side should be different. One reason would be cloud coverage. Another would be some kind of obstructions. Seeing there is none, you can take a reading with your incident meter standing few yards away from your lens. Because the light rays are parallel and distance doesn't matter when the light source is THAT far, you can reasonably be sure the reading is correct.

    IF there are any ultra bright spot or dark shadow that I would want detail, I then set my meter to spot incident and take measurements. Then if necessary, adjust my exposure.

    IF there are reasons why lighting condition may be different, then incident method like this is unsuitable. Then, I'd do spot reading of key points. It'll be the usual zone system then.

    I think, the real key is, never assume what the meter is reading is the setting we must use. Either method will give enough information for the photographer to decide what exposure setting one must use. Except for very simple cases, point, measure, set, shoot isn't possible. There has to be a thinking and compensating step in there.
    Last edited by tkamiya; 12-29-2010 at 02:24 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  7. #17

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    Spot incident??
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  8. #18
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stradibarrius View Post
    To use the incident meter for landscapes...do you just hold the meter up and take a reading? I have always pointed the reflective meter at the "landscape view" and took a reading. Have i been doing it wrong?
    No, you haven't been doing it wrong. However, the general reflective meter allows the greatest amount of error since it only reads the reflected light and has such a wide angle of view. The spot meter will restrict the reading to very specific areas, but still requires you to judge how much over or under exposure is necessary to acquire that tone in the negative. The incident meter will measure the light falling on the subject regardless of how dark or bright that subject is, and will give you a very accurate reading without additional judgements. To use this method, you simply hold the meter up in light equivalent to that falling on the subject and point the white dome towards the camera lens. Ideally you should get the same reading as if you pointed your meter at a gray card in the same light.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

    Did millions of people suddenly disappear? This may have an answer.

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  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Koehrer View Post
    Spot incident??
    That's a super secret and patented mode I developed. You heard it first here!



    I meant spot reflective. I'd correct it if I can.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  10. #20
    stradibarrius's Avatar
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    Are the additional features on the L-358 worth the additional $50.00 over a Sekonic L-308S or Gossen Digipro-F?
    Being able to average readings and the back light seem that they would be useful features????
    Sometimes you think you will use some features and in reality you do not.
    "Generalizations are made because they are generally true"
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    Barry
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