Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,565   Posts: 1,573,465   Online: 775
      
Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 54
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    24
    Thank you!!! This confirms it for me. I appreciate the feedback.

  2. #12
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,504
    Images
    299
    I have never worked in a studio, but I know from experience that Lee knows what he's talking about.

    And, incident metering works all the time, regardless of what the lighting is. The key is to meter at the object, pointing the dome to the camera lens opening general direction. The idea is that your meter should see the light that your camera lens is photographing.

    It doesn't matter if the object is very bright, very dark, or if it's all mid-tones; the tones will be rendered correctly if you meter this way.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lee L View Post
    If someone told you, or you read somewhere that incident metering doesn't work for portraits or close-ups, they didn't know what they were talking about.

    Hold the meter at the subject's position (or in lighting identical to that of the subject) with the dome pointed toward the camera position, and you should get an excellent exposure.

    In all the commercial and advertizing studios I worked in (about a dozen), this is the way metering was done for table top, portrait, and group photography. Checks were done on Polaroid before shooting film.

    Lee
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #13
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    Yep, incident will work well for portraits. But....

    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    If you're shooting medium format or larger and using a handheld meter, don't forget to account for bellows factor at portrait distances.
    ...pay attention to this ^^^
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  4. #14
    ghostcount's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Near The Platinum Triangle, California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    252
    Images
    11
    Should the dome face the light or the camera? I just saw Dean Collin's video and I believe he stated the incident meter dome should face the light not the camera. I assume if you have the light on the subject's side and you face the dome towards the camera, wouldn't the dome partially meter the shadow side also since it is not illuminated evenly? Wouldn't facing the meter towards the light give a more accurate reading since the whole dome is illuminated evenly?

    Just curious as I do not work in a studio also.
    “I drank what?” - Socrates

  5. #15
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,443
    Images
    20
    But which light? The main and the fill both contribute to the exposure, so to determine the overall exposure, I point the dome toward the lens from the subject position. To determine the contrast ratio, however, I would point the meter at the main, then the fill, and compare the readings
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #16
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Brooklyn, N.Y. USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,458
    Images
    47
    The dome is a dome for a reason. It is a 3 dimensional representation of the subject and catches the light falling on, across and around the subject. The dome should point at the camera regardless of the direction of the light source.

    The disk, on the other hand, is a representation of a flat surface, such as a picture on the wall. It receives an even illulmination across the surface.

    In either case the dome or disk should point to the camera.

    I never worked in a studio either.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,021
    Images
    4
    You can use either method for most situations. Use the one that works best for what you want to do. I use both types of meters, myself.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  8. #18
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Beaverton, OR, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,793
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by ghostcount View Post
    Should the dome face the light or the camera? I just saw Dean Collin's video and I believe he stated the incident meter dome should face the light not the camera. I assume if you have the light on the subject's side and you face the dome towards the camera, wouldn't the dome partially meter the shadow side also since it is not illuminated evenly? Wouldn't facing the meter towards the light give a more accurate reading since the whole dome is illuminated evenly?

    Just curious as I do not work in a studio also.
    Dome to the camera works well.

    Turning the dome to the light, just measures the light pointed at the subject.

    The dome "mimics" a face and measures the light the camera will be able to see.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #19
    ghostcount's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Near The Platinum Triangle, California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    252
    Images
    11
    Hmmm.. I guess as long as you are consistent you can "chuck up" the exposure delta to be insignificant and film latitude can recover it.
    I wonder if you get more difference in exposure density due to film processing.
    “I drank what?” - Socrates

  10. #20
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,121
    Images
    6
    Reflected readings isn't necessarily better than incident reading. it's all how you like to work. Incident readings aren't useful for the zone system though.

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin