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  1. #11
    donkee's Avatar
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    I would ship it off to Quality Light.

    I sent my IVf to them. It was having major issues (7 stops off, corded mode did not work, display would start flashing and it would shut down) and cost less that 100.00 to fix. You can't replace it for that much.

    They are No.1 in my book.

  2. #12

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    I also own a Minolta flash meter. It was the meter that I took with me to Paris because I wanted to be sure of my exposures and didn't want to count on my little (analog, selenium) Sekonic. It wasn't until I got back that I realized that the damn thing was reading at least three stops off! My repairman told me that he couldn't fix it because Minolta (Corp.) never released the schematics for their electronic gear. Now I use it only for enlarging.

  3. #13
    Klainmeister's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by donkee View Post
    I would ship it off to Quality Light.

    I sent my IVf to them. It was having major issues (7 stops off, corded mode did not work, display would start flashing and it would shut down) and cost less that 100.00 to fix. You can't replace it for that much.

    They are No.1 in my book.
    Thanks, I had searched for a repair place for quite some time and didn't find anything that seemed legit. This is in LA?
    K.S. Klain

  4. #14

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  5. #15

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    Minolta meter self repair.

    My Minolta meter was giving erratic readings. I repaired it by dismantling the head and polishing the metal contact strips. All of them, because it as easier than figuring out just where the problem was.

    I used a Dremel like handheld tool with a polishing disc and some metal polish. This removed the oxidation and the meter has worked reliably for a couple of years now, giving consistent repeatable readings. It wasn't necessary to unsolder any wires.

  6. #16

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    I also have had inaccurate readings from a IV f. I bought it at a camera show yesterday and, like the fool I am, did not check the readings against my camera. When I got it home, I realized that it was 4 or more stops underexposed! Indeed, there was a rattling sound coming from the diffuser chamber.

    I removed the battery, then unscrewed the two screws on the rear of the diffuser chamber. Several small colored discs and washer-like spacers came out. That was the rattle! I thought I had bought a broken meter (well, I had, but I thought I had one beyond repair).

    In desperation, I got out my magnifying glass and tried to repair the thing.

    The discs were a clear one, a grey one, and a green one. There were three “washers” or spacers. In the chamber, there is a piece of tin on two pegs. I lifted this off and under it, there’s a piece of oval plastic with the light sensor going through it. The face of the light sensor should sit behind the discs in the round hole that you can see from the front of the unit if you remove the diffuser dome. This oval piece should sit under two plastic lips to keep it in place. Mine had come loose from the lips, allowing the sensor to come free as well as the discs.

    Using a pair of tweezers, I gently replaced the discs with the clear one going in first, then the grey one, then the green one. Then I put in the spacers. In retrospect, I should have layered the discs and spacers, I think. Anyway, I then pushed the sensor back into the oval plastic bit, then pushed the oval plastic bit down and twisted it so that it rested under the plastic lips. This then kept the sensor, discs and spacers nested in their hole. I replaced the back of the diffuser chamber.

    I have only tested the meter in ambient mode, but it is now very close to the metering on my Fuji X100s. The grey card metered on the Minolta at 400 ISO, 1/60 at f2.0. The Fuji X100s measured the grey card at 400 ISO at 1/52 at f2.0.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Much better than the 4 full stops when I started out, and within the tolerances of the calibration knob on the back of the IV f.

    Has anyone else had this experience upon opening one of these?
    Last edited by LinusK; 03-10-2014 at 12:55 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Add pics

  7. #17
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    MY Flashmeter IV went haywire in the middle of an important studio assignment. It was so far off Iknew it had to be wrong. It was snet back to Minolta for repair and in about a year the same thing happened. It went into the trash and needless to say I have not owned a Minolta meter since.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

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