Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,550   Posts: 1,544,710   Online: 990
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26
  1. #1
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,420
    Images
    2

    Photographing Artwork - Archiving of a Museum Collection

    I have the exciting opportunity to catalog and photograph a small museum collection. The items will mostly be prints, paintings and possibly a few photographs and sculptures.

    Some of the works will be framed and behind glass.

    I know that a whole career can be devoted to doing this kind of thing right, but I'm looking for some general tips & information that will help me get the best results.

    I'll need to bring a small lighting setup, and I'm wondering what else. The typical setup seems to be two lights at a specific angle to the print, to avoid glare. I'm slightly curious about "cross polarizing", but unfortunately I don't have polarizing filters large enough for lights.

    Any insight will be helpful. Thanks!
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  2. #2
    Greg Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Crestview Hills, KY
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,923
    I do this on occasion, I used to do a lot of it, including 8 foot paintings. Get this book, it will give you all the information you need. I get large polarizing film from Lee filters sold by many film and theater supply companies. Use a good glass polarizer for the lens and this film for the lights. I also recommend you get a color target like Kodak Q-13, Q-14, or a Macbeth color chart.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

    Did millions of people suddenly disappear? This may have an answer.

    "No one knows that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father." -Matthew 24:36

  3. #3
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,420
    Images
    2
    Thanks Greg, I will check it out from the library.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  4. #4
    Greg Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Crestview Hills, KY
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,923
    A copy stand is nice for small items, but you can use the same set up you would use for large prints and paintings if necessary. If you are using 35mm or a DSLR, use a distortion free macro lens. MF and LF lenses don't have the issues the small format lenses do.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

    Did millions of people suddenly disappear? This may have an answer.

    "No one knows that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father." -Matthew 24:36

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    664
    You should use a lens polarizer to eliminate as much unpolarized glare as possible. You’ll have to rotate the polarizer about to find the orientation that helps the most. You should eliminate as much straight-on light as possible, as that will create mirror-like reflections.

    It’s helpful to get a large piece of stiff cardboard and either paint it flat black on the side facing the art, or better yet, cover it with black velvet cloth which you can get from a fabric shop. You’ll make the anti-reflection board with a hole in it for your lens to stick through. You’ll have to hold the AR board or rig some sort of holder. The whole thing should be as light as possible for easy handling.

    It should be as large as needed to prevent reflections from the camera and yourself. It helps to wear dark (preferably black clothing). The AR board mustn’t block the source lights, of course.

    Exposure must be determined by gray card just in front of the art if a reflected-light meter is all you’ve got. An incident-light meter is more convenient. It must be just in front of the art to get an accurate reading.

    Two lights at 45° the same distance from the art usually works best for flat work. You might have to modify this a bit to kill as much specular reflections as possible. In some cases you’ll get better results with a broader light, such as bouncing off, or shooting through a white, translucent umbrella.

    Three-dimensional art needs some differential modeling light similar to what you’d use in making a portrait to bring out the three-dimensional shape.

  6. #6
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,420
    Images
    2
    Great recommendations all around. Particularly the AR board; that makes a lot of sense.

    Unfortunately I'll be doing this numerically (if you know what I mean) and that limits my lens options somewhat. What is the ideal focal-length for this kind of work, or does it depend.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  7. #7
    Greg Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Crestview Hills, KY
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,923
    I use a 50mm macro on 35mm or full frame DSLR.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

    Did millions of people suddenly disappear? This may have an answer.

    "No one knows that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father." -Matthew 24:36

  8. #8
    DWThomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,238
    Images
    65
    There was a discussion here a while back about polarizers. There was also another about photographing artwork that I don't seem able to provoke the search into finding.

    There are a few photos of my latest setup toward the bottom of this gallery (we won't discuss the camera type, but it doesn't really matter). The details aren't well illustrated, but you can see the general layout. I built a simple stand that has legs that fasten on with wingnuts so it comes apart for travel. Some other shots for 3-D stuff are found here. (The last on that page shows my stand a little better.) I shoot the winners of shows my local art club puts on, so it's typically a twice a year event. And it's mostly for the web at intentionally limited size, so isn't as critical as "fine art reproduction".

    Including a gray scale and mayhaps a color chart as a strip along the perimeter can prove useful.

    I shoot through a dark baffle and find oil paintings which often have a shiny varnish over very irregular textures to be far more challenging to shoot than work under glass.

  9. #9
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Misissauaga Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,939
    Images
    29
    I second Greg's advice on the Kodak Copying and Duplication. The Amazon picture shows the back cover of this book. A lot of the films they mention are , as one would expect, out of production, but the techniiqes are not. You will understand a lot more about practical uses for better denitisitoimetry from this book. I used it to aid in calibrating some dupe films and an interneg film that I have a few hunded feet of in the garage freezer.

    You are in a photography course in college aren't you?

    If not, I would worry about how you are ever going to graduate in anything else with the great photographic learning curiousity you exhibit here.
    my real name, imagine that.

  10. #10
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,420
    Images
    2
    DW, those links to the copy setup are invaluable. I'm really glad I asked this question; I kind of thought I had it all in place but there's a lot more I hadn't considered.

    Gray scale, color chart; all good things.

    Mike, I am currently not in photography school, but my goal is to attend Ryerson in Toronto for their Photographic Preservation & Collections Management graduate program. This is exactly the kind of expertise I need to gain and be able to exhibit in order to get in, me thinks. Thanks for (what I feel are) your very kind words about my photographic curiousity.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin