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  1. #21
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Hey Coops,

    Welcome to APUG.

    So here's a bit of a primer on flash.

    The first thing to understand about flash is that it's range is limited, before everybody says well duh, that concept matters especially in fill flash.

    I think of flash shots as two separate exposures; an ambient light exposure outside the range of the flash and then the main subject's exposure at a very specific range from the camera.

    The ambient light exposure is controlled purely by the aperture, time, and film speed just like any normal shot. Just meter and set the camera normally to get your background where you want it.

    The next thing to understand is that flash is really fast. A full power flash may last 1/2000th of a second, as power is reduced flash duration gets even shorter. Most modern flash guns control flash out put by controlling the duration of the flash. Since the flash duration is normally shorter than the shutter open duration, the shutter has no effect on the flash, only aperture and film speed do.

    What that all means is simply that you set your flash gun to match the aperture and film speed being used in the camera.

    With fill flash all we are trying to do is control contrast, a little pop to get the subject brightness more in balance with the background.

    If the subject is covering a fair share of the frame, "auto" mode may work just fine. Dont know about your flash gun but my Nikon units will actually indicate the range of distances this method will work in once the aperture and ISO are set. If yours does the same, at this point you just go to shooting.

    The manual mode takes a bit more work and practice and study. Essentially you dial in a power setting in the flash gun that will work at a certain range. If you move in closer you will need to reduce flash output, if you move away you need to increase output.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  2. #22
    hpulley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by olleorama View Post
    People who get paid to model usually don't bother. More like brides and grooms, relatives, kids and what not. And if we're talking fp-100C which is the one available, as mentioned, it would be a lot more than 30s..
    Again, people find the instant pictures fun and the wait is not a problem. It is only an issue for the first one. Take one, take it out, take another, take it out... first one is ready so peel and show, then second is ready, peel and show... everyone can pass around the pictures at once and they can look at pictures you've already taken while you are taking more pictures which you can't do with a DSLR ;-)

    A silly little installation I made this morning, a fuji instant picture taken with a Polaroid Automatic 100 camera (which has a light leak sadly), then 'scanned' with a Canon EOS 1D pro camera. Everything in this picture says PROFESSIONAL on it but only two things are used by pros these days IMO, the EOS 1D and the CPS card...


    Professional by Harry Pulley, on Flickr

    For a guy who said he was done with this thread I sure have written a lot, sorry again. Time for work, rant over...
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

    Happiness is...

  3. #23
    olleorama's Avatar
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    I use my rb proffesionally. Not with fujiroids though. I save them for myself.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    Hey Coops,

    The next thing to understand is that flash is really fast. A full power flash may last 1/2000th of a second, as power is reduced flash duration gets even shorter. Most modern flash guns control flash out put by controlling the duration of the flash. Since the flash duration is normally shorter than the shutter open duration, the shutter has no effect on the flash, only aperture and film speed do.

    What that all means is simply that you set your flash gun to match the aperture and film speed being used in the camera.

    So with flash being so fast the shutter speed is less important? Do you use pretty much the same shutter speed and adjust the aperture on the camera to the flash gun? For example my meter requires I put in a shutter speed to give me a flash/ambient reading. Using a 400 speed film I entered 100th sec, fired the flash at the meter and and was given 5.6 at 100th of a second. I would set the camera and flash to 5.6, make sure the iso was correct and thats it?
    Guiess I could reduce the flash (using manual) by fractions and see what effect that has.
    Thanks

  5. #25
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by coops View Post
    So with flash being so fast the shutter speed is less important? Do you use pretty much the same shutter speed and adjust the aperture on the camera to the flash gun? For example my meter requires I put in a shutter speed to give me a flash/ambient reading. Using a 400 speed film I entered 100th sec, fired the flash at the meter and and was given 5.6 at 100th of a second. I would set the camera and flash to 5.6, make sure the iso was correct and thats it?
    Guiess I could reduce the flash (using manual) by fractions and see what effect that has.
    Thanks
    Shutter speed does not affect what the flash adds to the exposure

    Shutter speed will change the affect of the ambient light.

    For the subjects in range of the flash, flash + ambient = exposure.

    Outside that range only ambient counts.

    I'm not familiar with your meter so I don't know on that.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post



    For the subjects in range of the flash, flash + ambient = exposure.
    Great. Appreciate it. Makes more sense put that way.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by coops View Post
    So with flash being so fast the shutter speed is less important? Do you use pretty much the same shutter speed and adjust the aperture on the camera to the flash gun? For example my meter requires I put in a shutter speed to give me a flash/ambient reading. Using a 400 speed film I entered 100th sec, fired the flash at the meter and and was given 5.6 at 100th of a second. I would set the camera and flash to 5.6, make sure the iso was correct and thats it?
    Guiess I could reduce the flash (using manual) by fractions and see what effect that has.
    Thanks
    The meter makes you enter a shutter speed because it makes the measurement in that time period. If there is only thei illumination of the very short duration flash then which shutter sped you set doesn't matter. But if there is ambient light the reading will be somewhat different.

  8. #28
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by coops View Post
    Great. Appreciate it. Makes more sense put that way.
    Glad to here it.

    This is why I set the camera up completely before setting the flash gun.

    As much as possible I want to use the flash just to brighten the subject "enough".
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    As much as possible I want to use the flash just to brighten the subject "enough".
    I did not want to waste film and cannot spend the money on a Polaroid back and film, so I borrowed a friends Canon 20d. I set up the flash meter, and with flash on full with a shutter speed of 100, made a reading. I think F11 was the aperture given by the meter. I found in pretty much every setup that at full, the flash was just a tad too much. By making a reading and turning the flash down about 25%, the results were really good, providing just enough light.
    Then using my dog as a model (works for cheese) shot a roll of 400 Portra and a roll of Astia using the technique listed above. I was driven back in by the mosquitos so only two rolls and will have them back tomorrow, so hopefully they will look good.

  10. #30
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    As much as possible I want to use the flash just to brighten the subject "enough".
    Exactly. I would set the meter at double the box speed, in this case 800, take an incident reading with the flash meter, and open the aperture 1/2 stop more than what the meter says for the shutter speed you've selected. This should give you nice even lighting without overexposing.
    Jim

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