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  1. #11
    mablo's Avatar
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    I have a mint Varipower VP-1 module for 283 strobes lying around. PM me if interested.

  2. #12
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    I'm holding my VP-1 in my hands right now. Although it may not actually reduce the power by 5 stops, it is marked on the front of the dial from full to 1/32 power (-5 stops). If you are planning to use a Vivitar 283 with either a very modern film camera with advanced electronics or a digital camera, I would highly recommend using it with either a safe sync, or via the PC socket. Don't use it across the hot shoe because they're highly likely to put out way too much juice and fry the TTL circuitry at a minimum.

  3. #13
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    I'm holding my VP-1 in my hands right now. Although it may not actually reduce the power by 5 stops, it is marked on the front of the dial from full to 1/32 power (-5 stops). If you are planning to use a Vivitar 283 with either a very modern film camera with advanced electronics or a digital camera, I would highly recommend using it with either a safe sync, or via the PC socket. Don't use it across the hot shoe because they're highly likely to put out way too much juice and fry the TTL circuitry at a minimum.
    I'll go so far as to repeat this warning plus warn as well that some cameras may also be damaged if you use the PC socket. It seems that for some cameras that have a PC socket (relatively rare now) the PC socket is designed to handle higher trigger voltages than the hot shoe, while for others the trigger circuitry in the PC socket and in the hot shoe is actually the same, and it is difficult to tell which is which.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #14
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    I think it's a myth that the pc socket can handle a higher voltage than the hot shoe. Why should it? It would be designed with the same circuit or a parallel connection.

    I think the reality is that some manufacturers are worried that in sliding a charged flash into a hot shoe, the centre pin might make contact with one of the other contacts and cause damage.


    Steve.

  5. #15
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    If you want to use the Vivitar 283 or other similar vintage flash with high trigger voltage, there is a thing called a "safe sync":

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...t_Shoe_to.html

    That, or a wireless slave sync system would be the best way to use a 283 with any camera you are not sure can handle it.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    I think it's a myth that the pc socket can handle a higher voltage than the hot shoe. Why should it? It would be designed with the same circuit or a parallel connection.

    I think the reality is that some manufacturers are worried that in sliding a charged flash into a hot shoe, the centre pin might make contact with one of the other contacts and cause damage.


    Steve.
    The PC sync socket doesn't take higher voltage than the hot shoe. Only newer camera has lower voltage rating for the flash sync circuit and it's for both the PC connector and hot shoe.

  7. #17
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chan Tran View Post
    The PC sync socket doesn't take higher voltage than the hot shoe. Only newer camera has lower voltage rating for the flash sync circuit and it's for both the PC connector and hot shoe.
    That was my point (well, half of it). PC socket and hot shoe will be the same rating... and it's usually 250 volts for most modern cameras.


    Steve.

  8. #18
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I know I've read at least one Canon brochure or manual for one of their earlier, mid to high range digital bodies that stated that the PC socket was designed to withstand higher trigger voltages, and recommended using that rather than the hot shoe for older flashes.

    Unfortunately, I can't remember which model.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #19
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    I test all my 283's and mark them although I only have a multimeter to test and have seen people comment you need more sophisticated equipment to get a true trigger voltage.

    Most of mine are under 8v. I usually radio trigger them anyway but a hot one could fry your radio receiver at the flash end.

    I like the 283 and have literally a bag full and run them off quantum turbos.

  10. #20

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    More about the VP-1. I have three of them, each has its own 283. I also have a flash meter. If the VP-1's little knob is turned as far as it will go past -5 it will give a repeatable -6 stops.

    I've changed my mind about this, mainly because of the difficulty of setting a VP-1 exactly at a marked output level (or my ineptitude), but from -1 down they give a GN that is the marked number of stops down from the flash's rated GN (120, ISO 100/feet). At full power all of my 283s are a bit more than 1/2 stop down from rated.

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