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  1. #11
    127
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    My girlfriend is a wedding photographer - I tag along to fetch and carry sometimes, so I've picked up a few tricks, and seen the pitfalls. You're on the right lines with Keep It Simple - things are VERY intense, constantly changing, and you don't want to be worrying about things you don't need to. The most scary thing is the pace that everything needs to happen at - you need to be fast, mobile and flexible.

    On a recent job, the bride kept postponing the "big group shot", until it was pitch dark outside. In the end it had to be done indoors with flash - definalty not ideal:
    <link removed>
    This was just a Metz 45cl4. It's not clever, and it's not pretty, but it got the shot that was needed in difficult circumstances. The client doesn't care that the light isn't perfect - they care that Auntie Mavis looks nice, and they're having a fun day.

    Ian
    Last edited by 127; 10-31-2004 at 04:16 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #12
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    Thanks for the advice Fred. While I would certainly prefer to shoot without flash, it's what I always try to aim for. However, having it shot using a high speed film wouldn't give the results the couple are expecting, (much as I'd love to do it in the reportage style that Cheryl Jacobs posted a short while ago.)

    Thanks,

    Martin

  3. #13
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    Ian, thanks for posting the photo, do you have any technical details to add, focal length, film speed and aperture would be helpfull. (If only to help put my mind at rest.)

    Hopefully the big group will get done very early on, at least that's what I'm planning for.

    Regards

    Martin

  4. #14
    Cheryl Jacobs's Avatar
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    Martin, I just did another wedding about a week ago. I did 99% reportage B&W, pushing film as needed. I did, however, need to get at least a few color shots of the ceremony itself, which was in a very dimly lit, large church. While I love ISO 3200 B&W and shot lots of it, I don't love high ISO color films, so I had to resort to my flash. I simply used a bounce flash, and bounced it off my hand. Much softer light, and no attachments and cards to fuss with. I'd attach an image, but I haven't had an opportunity to scan them yet.

  5. #15
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    I don't understand the resistance to flash, I have been shooting wedding for years and as long as you understand the the correct ususage of flash and how it interacts with the film, the results can be quite pleasing.

    Most of the top wedding photographers in the US, use flash all the time.

    At least it works for the type of weddings I do, I would rather work with a flash that with the other problems associated with not using it.

    Not a complaint, just wondering though.

    Dave Parker
    Ground Glass Specialties.

  6. #16
    Cheryl Jacobs's Avatar
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    I don't understand the resistance to flash, I have been shooting wedding for years and as long as you understand the the correct ususage of flash and how it interacts with the film, the results can be quite pleasing.
    I simply prefer the look of natural light. I do understand correct usage of flash, and the look is quite different to me. There is a large, and growing, number of wedding photographers who avoid flash unless there's absolutely no way to shoot with available light. Jeff Ascough is a noteable example.

    At least it works for the type of weddings I do, I would rather work with a flash that with the other problems associated with not using it.
    Not sure which "other problems" you're referring to?


    - CJ

  7. #17

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    I've shot three weddings in my life. Fortuately, I did OK on all of them. I had a flash meter and used it for every different group shot. IT WAS WORTH ITS WEIGHT IN GOLD. I'd humbly recommend you beg, borrow or steal one for the day. The reduction in angst will be considerable.

  8. #18
    Cheryl Jacobs's Avatar
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    I would certainly recommend having a bounce flash unit on hand, because when you need it, you need it. I just am not one of those that believes you cannot do wedding photography without flashing every image.

    Tom, do you mean a flash meter, or a flash unit?

  9. #19
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    Okay Cheryl,

    I was just asking and I will keep putting money in the bank, as I said, if you know how to use your flash, the natural light look is quite easy to achieve.

    No argument, just a differance of opinon.

    Dave Parker
    Ground Glass Specialties

  10. #20
    Cheryl Jacobs's Avatar
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    I was just asking and I will keep putting money in the bank, as I said, if you know how to use your flash, the natural light look is quite easy to achieve.
    We'll have to agree to disagree on this one. Personally, I find the natural light easiest and most rewarding to achieve with actual natural light. One important difference is the direction of the light. Unless you have an assistant running around holding the flash for you, you light is going to come from very close to your camera. Even if you hand hold the flash, you can't get it further away from you than arm's length. That's a big difference right there.

    No argument, just a differance of opinon.
    Of course.

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