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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Sukach
    Does anyone here think that their photographs are "perfect"?
    I know I haven't made my first "perfect" print yet ... and to tell the truth, I don't expect to ...ever.
    I do work toward perfection, but I don't think I'll make it - at least not until *I* am perfect.
    Interesting question and supposition, Ed.

    Sometimes I think that we have difficulty understanding each other because of difference in culture and language.

    However, in response to your post, I have felt that at times that I have made expressive prints. Were they perfect? In whose judgement? Did it speak to me? Yes... Did it speak to someone else? Yes, quite often... However whether it speaks to another is not the purpose of photography to me.

    I like what Jerry Uelsmann expressed in his interview with Robert Hirsh (Photovision Sept/Oct 2002) "I believe in the modernist proposition that each individual has his or her own personal vision and I work to celebrate that." and he goes on to say "I do not have a specific agenda, but I try to amaze myself. However the more you work the more difficult it becomes to be satisfied with things you did before".

    I think that this thread began with someone addressing their own angst over failing to produce what they determined to be a result equal to someone else...I think that this point of reference will always leave one dissatified with themselves. I speak from experience when I say this because I did that at one time.

    I work at producing what speaks of the vision that I have of this life that I experience...realizing always that another's vision will differ from mine. I can not express someone else's vision...because it is not mine. If I try to express another's vision then I present something not real in my experience...it will speak of imperfection...because it is.

    I still return to the basis of my original response...Vision is the important thing.

  2. #12

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    ed
    with what u say i think that none of bressons photos is perfect. they are not even focused well (bresson was using the scale before he was looking through the viewfinder, he was aproximating the exposure as well). i wish i have the reputation of bresson.
    sometimes when i look at my older prints i say i would do that and that now with those prints, but it will not be the same photo cause it will reflect something else.
    yes, it is not eassy to define picture as perfect wether it is yours or others, but with some fight with own-self and work u can do it finally. i usually critisize my own works more than others, and in this flow of self critisizm i define to myself a new levels and a new paradigms of perfection. i think that this way every one who wants to create something, especially arts, should learn to respect his own self.
    besides... when i say perfect i dont mean to platonic "ideas" perfection, i dont belive in it.
    victor

  3. #13

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    don
    i like what u say...
    mainly about the vission. without the vission all this arts doesnt worth anything.
    victor

  4. #14

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    Currently I am participating in my own workshop, that is, a visual exploration (and capture) of the Alfred Noble Park which lies 5 minutes from where I live in Stockholm. It is a small hill which is a visual feast of details and shapes, especially during winter where the snow affects a new scenic favour every day. I use this place to see, to practice, to experiment and ultimately to have fun. Until not that long ago I was of the belief that I need a GRAND CANYON to match my 8x10. Not anymore - thanks to the inspirational work I see from lesser known photographers (thought definitely not lesser photographers). We should strive to be in our own workshop as often as possible.
    Francesco

  5. #15
    lee
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    Ed said, "Does anyone here think that their photographs are "perfect"?
    I know I haven't made my first "perfect" print yet ... and to tell the truth, I don't expect to ...ever.
    I do work toward perfection, but I don't think I'll make it - at least not until *I* am perfect."

    One should try to achieve a level of printing that is consistent with the vision that the artist has. I don't think that it is a question of "Am I perfect?" No, For me, it is "does this print I am holding and looking at achieve the goals that I had when I set out to make the photograph?" In my eyes, over printing is as big a sin (photographically) as not printing it well enough in the first place. One should strive to make the best print they can, but one should realise that making good negatives makes that process easier.

    lee\c

  6. #16

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    Francesco,


    I think one of the greatest misconsceptions ever to come out of the cult of Ansel is the idea that the "grand landscape" is the only true calling for those who aspire with a LF camera.

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