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  1. #11

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    You should be able to find a 8x10 film holder on ebay for around $20.

    You also will want to attach a 1/4" nut on the bottom and side so you can attache the camera to a tripod.

  2. #12

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    Great stuff guys. Keep it coming!

    I'm scouting out some cheaper film holders on Ebay. Hopefully that will pan out. I think that in the end it will be the most convenient way of handling changing the film (well paper negative). I don't own a changing bag. I'm not opposed to buying one, but other than this project, I haven't needed one yet.

  3. #13
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    If you are not going to use a changing bag, then I agree some kind of film holders could be useful. You might consider your likely use of the camera too... a simple box is easy to make or find, and you might be able to make several in the time it takes to make one that will accommodate a film holder.

    A "single shot" camera isn't awful, and it has some positive side effects. I often take my coffee can camera out with a single piece of paper in it knowing that I can only make one picture. There is a certain mindset that happens when you know you only have one exposure to make, and I enjoy it and like the "finality" of it and wondering how it will come out as I drive home. I have some old cameras that I use this way too and it makes the selection and taking of the photograph special... it focuses your attention! The changing bag and extra paper come along when it will be a longer photo day.

    With 8x10 negatives, since I will be planning to contact print them, I can imagine mostly working this way even if I have the ability to change paper in the field. Making two or three simple cameras instead of a more complicated one for film holders or changeable paper is something I'll consider.

  4. #14

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    hey, not a bad idea at all. I never really considered that. No reason I couldn't build 2 or 3 of these things, load them all in the darkroom and take them with me. As long as I stay close to the car, I'd be good.

  5. #15
    NedL's Avatar
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    Add a simple wood plank base for the tripod, with some small bungee cords to attach one after the other! I'm talking myself into this approach too!

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by edcculus View Post
    I'm scouting out some cheaper film holders on Ebay. Hopefully that will pan out..
    PM sent
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Nikon S2, Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T, Nikon F4s, Olympus Pen FT, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras.

  7. #17
    Joe VanCleave's Avatar
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    I've built a number of simple craft-box or foamcore box cameras, using as a common support a piece of wood with tripod nut and several brass hooks on the sides to attached bungee cords. The wooden base gets attached to the tripod head and I can carry several box cameras in my backpack.

    Alternatively, I've also built foamcore box cameras with a storage compartment in the back for exposed and unexposed sheets, changed out using a changing bag. For these types of cameras I build the bottom of the foamcore box onto a dedicated piece of wood, with tripod nut built in. Then, all I need is a large changing bag carried in a small daypack, plus light meter, notebook and tripod.

    ~Joe

  8. #18
    NedL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe VanCleave View Post
    .....common support a piece of wood with tripod nut and several brass hooks on the sides to attached bungee cords......~Joe
    Hi Joe, I just added the hooks on Saturday and got some "mini" bungee cords. Simple, effective and works like a charm! And the hooks can hold the cords when not in use! Simple things like this make it easier to concentrate on making the photo... thanks!

  9. #19

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    I'm traveling for the next 2 weekends, so my end of this build is going slow. Updates when I get something ready!

  10. #20
    Joe VanCleave's Avatar
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    Another simple camera idea is to go to Hobby Lobby and find those photo/video storage boxes. They have one that's covered in black felt, including the lid where it wraps under and mates with the body of the box that also is covered with felt. Meaning that the storage box comes from the store already light-tight, all you have to do is cut a small hole in the center of the lid for the pinhole and shutter (I use a rotating piece of Masonite secured by a small machine screw and nut as a shutter).

    The lid can be kept secure by several large rubber bands (or several small bungee cords).

    The inside of the box is not quite tall enough for 8x10 paper, so you simply curve the paper slightly and it will fit fine in the bottom of the box.

    This is the easiest box to convert to pinhole that I've yet found in a store.

    ______________

    Another idea are those black with aluminum trim file storage boxes at office supply stores. These have a slot and groove fastener for the lid, which you need to paint flat black, but otherwise these boxes can be light-tight as-is, provided the hinges are not flimsy and the lid is able to lock securely to the body of the box.

    The ones I've seen at Staples are lined on the inside with a black, felt-like fabric, all you would need to do is cut a hole in one side for the pinhole and shutter, and fix a simple plate on the other side to secure the paper or film.

    Or affix arm sleeves to the box and you could change out the paper in the field?

    And I think some of these boxes are legal-sized, meaning they might fit 11x14 paper.

    ~Joe

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