Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,966   Posts: 1,523,344   Online: 1181
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21

Thread: WW1 landscapes

  1. #11
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    İstanbul - Türkiye
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,719
    Images
    108
    Totally agree with Tom, good introduction make you win a job or school but does not keep you there.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    USA, Pac/NW
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    368
    The way he photographed those views, they lose any reference to that place in location and time.
    ...as you say the "landscape" views lacked any identifying geographic features and could have been any number of locations...
    Worst quality and composition I have ever seen.
    I have seen many excellent pinhole photographs but these are the worst I have ever seen.
    Terrible. Total waste of film and my time to look at it.
    I have to agree. The images are poor examples of what can be achieved with a camera...pinhole or not.
    Possibly there is something to learn from these images, though...aside from his poor composition.

    Longer exposure times maybe...on a brighter day? Was there camera-motion blur in those images?
    The pinhole itself that he used may have issues. Pinhole too large? Pinhole not perfectly round?
    The inner edge of the pinhole may have burrs, and/or the wafer used to make the pinhole was too thick?

    Marc

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Peak District, Derbyshire, UK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    260
    I saw the photographs in an entirely different way.

    They are from a soldiers point of view. The soldier has no clear idea of what is going on, their only hope of survival is to keep their head down. They have little or no knowledge of the landscape around them, and even if they had been there before the shells started falling the landscape would have soon become featureless. The soldiers days would be grey, monotonous, lacking in anything pretty.

    So I think Killington is using the expressive power of the photograph to reflect these points, purposely avoiding your average chocolate box clarity where you can point at something identifiable, because there was nothing a soldier could identify with, everything was alien, except the prospect of death.

    So I really don't know what you think can be achieved by using a lens and making topographic records of the places (besides which it has been done before). There is no point at all in technical mastery if that is all you've got, and I'd say there was more technical mastery in Killington's pictures in discovering an image form that expressed the soldiers perspective than knowing what happens when you stop the lens down to f/32 and use a few camera movements. Just a few people know the rules well enough to know how to break them, who go out on a limb and be brave enough to translate a feeling and sense of alienation into a photograph, and I think he succeeds.

    Steve
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_barnett/

    book
    wood, water, rock,
    landscape photographs in and around the Peak District National Park, UK.

  4. #14
    SMBooth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Melbourne, North/West
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    965
    Images
    7
    I like your thought process Steve.

  5. #15
    TheToadMen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Netherlands, Europe
    Shooter
    Pinhole
    Posts
    1,193
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by 250swb View Post
    I saw the photographs in an entirely different way.

    They are from a soldiers point of view. The soldier has no clear idea of what is going on, their only hope of survival is to keep their head down. They have little or no knowledge of the landscape around them, and even if they had been there before the shells started falling the landscape would have soon become featureless. The soldiers days would be grey, monotonous, lacking in anything pretty.

    So I think Killington is using the expressive power of the photograph to reflect these points, purposely avoiding your average chocolate box clarity where you can point at something identifiable, because there was nothing a soldier could identify with, everything was alien, except the prospect of death.

    So I really don't know what you think can be achieved by using a lens and making topographic records of the places (besides which it has been done before). There is no point at all in technical mastery if that is all you've got, and I'd say there was more technical mastery in Killington's pictures in discovering an image form that expressed the soldiers perspective than knowing what happens when you stop the lens down to f/32 and use a few camera movements. Just a few people know the rules well enough to know how to break them, who go out on a limb and be brave enough to translate a feeling and sense of alienation into a photograph, and I think he succeeds.

    Steve
    +1

    Try to look at it as more than just a technical exercise. Like a form of pictorialism or even a poetical photographic expression, but not a documentary.
    Then decide if he succeeded in his original intend and if you like it or not.
    Subjective as it may be.
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  6. #16
    abeku's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Sweden
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    426
    Images
    53
    I like this work too. The tunnel project is a nice documentary but the pinhole work has a more defined emotional awareness thanks to it's pictorial qualities.
    - You will develop when you become an analog photographer / Exposed Material / Monochromes

  7. #17
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    San Francisco area
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,840
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by TheToadMen View Post
    +1

    Try to look at it as more than just a technical exercise. Like a form of pictorialism or even a poetical photographic expression, but not a documentary.
    Then decide if he succeeded in his original intend and if you like it or not.
    Subjective as it may be.
    Well-articulated.
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

    My Flickr River of photographs
    http://flickriver.com/photos/rich815...r-interesting/

    My Photography Website
    http://www.lightshadowandtone.com

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    15,943
    i liked the landscapes,
    i wish there were more than just a handful of them.
    i'd love to see a whole room filled with them.
    the tunnels .. too much glaring colour, not enough dismal grey.
    ask me how ..

  9. #19
    realart21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Canada
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    18
    Stunning photos .

  10. #20
    Regular Rod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Derbyshire
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    402
    Quote Originally Posted by 250swb View Post
    I saw the photographs in an entirely different way.

    They are from a soldiers point of view. The soldier has no clear idea of what is going on, their only hope of survival is to keep their head down. They have little or no knowledge of the landscape around them, and even if they had been there before the shells started falling the landscape would have soon become featureless. The soldiers days would be grey, monotonous, lacking in anything pretty.

    So I think Killington is using the expressive power of the photograph to reflect these points, purposely avoiding your average chocolate box clarity where you can point at something identifiable, because there was nothing a soldier could identify with, everything was alien, except the prospect of death.

    So I really don't know what you think can be achieved by using a lens and making topographic records of the places (besides which it has been done before). There is no point at all in technical mastery if that is all you've got, and I'd say there was more technical mastery in Killington's pictures in discovering an image form that expressed the soldiers perspective than knowing what happens when you stop the lens down to f/32 and use a few camera movements. Just a few people know the rules well enough to know how to break them, who go out on a limb and be brave enough to translate a feeling and sense of alienation into a photograph, and I think he succeeds.

    Steve
    +1

    My only criticism is that the images are presented in too small a format...

    RR

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin