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  1. #11

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    Well ... all done. Not very elegant (well, a bit rough round the edges tbh), but perfectly functional

    In the end I found the Stanford instruction sheet only partly useful. It seemed easier just to start by taking one of the DDS and build the rest around it.

    Took me about 2 hours including tea breaks and wouldn't have taken that long had I not made a basic error of measurement and had to find a way to rescue myself from it. Or had less tea maybe.

    Almost the trickiest bit was making the "groove" in the backplate.

    It's surprisingly rigid (although I did end up adding an extra layer of foam board as part of my rescue tactic, so that probably helps), very light, but also slightly off-balance once the DDS is in - needs a bit of extra weight at the front to sort out the moment.

    The bungees to hold the DDS in tight are made from scrunchies tied together, and the pinhole from a can of Dr. Pepper someone had thrown over my garden wall.

    Pinhole is ~0.57mm (measured with an enlarger), focal length is ~150mm, so ~f/260.

    The next mod will be to epoxy a couple of 3/8" nuts to pieces of board, made flush with more foam board and glued to bottom and side, so I can use a tripod.

    It's enormous. I can't imagine walking down the street with it under my arm ...

    Here's a pic of the beast, plus the first negative I got out of it (on MGIV RC, EI6, developed in paRodinal 1:50) - scanned and inverted. I'll get round to trying to print it next week.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20140312_1125-P3122576-1.jpg   20140312_1122-P_10x8-Pinhole-paperneg-Rodinal-1200-001-1.jpg  
    Last edited by pdeeh; 03-12-2014 at 03:18 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #12
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    Nice! I just won an ePrey auction for three 8x10 holders, added to the two I already have that should encourage me to try harder to get out there!

  3. #13

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    Hey, I have a few questions about your build. I just did the 4X5 version.

    1- I'm using a can as well for my pinhole. I did the dimple and sand method. I tried using my enlarger to measure the pinhole, but didn't have much success. How can this be done somewhat accurately?
    2 - how did you secure the pinhole? I opted for some tape right now because I don't know if this is my final pinhole. The can is curved though. so it lifts the tape.

  4. #14

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    1. I just did the plastic-ruler-in-the-negative-carrier trick: Rack the enlarger up to the top, get a sharp image of the ruler's lines, measure what a 1cm line projects to on the baseboard/easel and the ratio 1:whatever is your enlargement factor. then put the pinhole in the same position, it'll project a white circle on the baseboard/easel, measure that and divide by the enlargement factor. The higher you can rack your enlarger the more accurate the final calculation will be. I think. I'm no engineer

    2. I secured it with double-sided tape, in a piece of thin card folded in half, and then taped the whole thing to the inside of the camera with duct-tape. Didn't have a problem with curve. Perhaps Dr. Pepper cans are thinner in the UK than in the US?

  5. #15
    NedL's Avatar
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    Great! Have fun!

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by pdeeh View Post
    1. I just did the plastic-ruler-in-the-negative-carrier trick: Rack the enlarger up to the top, get a sharp image of the ruler's lines, measure what a 1cm line projects to on the baseboard/easel and the ratio 1:whatever is your enlargement factor. then put the pinhole in the same position, it'll project a white circle on the baseboard/easel, measure that and divide by the enlargement factor. The higher you can rack your enlarger the more accurate the final calculation will be. I think. I'm no engineer

    2. I secured it with double-sided tape, in a piece of thin card folded in half, and then taped the whole thing to the inside of the camera with duct-tape. Didn't have a problem with curve. Perhaps Dr. Pepper cans are thinner in the UK than in the US?
    1- thanks. Thats basically what I did, but I'll give it another shot.
    2 - great idea. I just tried taping my pinhole directly inside the camera. Sandwiching it between some cardstock would solve the problem.

  7. #17

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    After a bit of reflection, I've realised that it would be pretty straightforward to make filmholders good enough for pinhole work out of layers of greyboard or styrene.

    You wouldn't have to worry about the "T-distance" so tolerances are not at all critical.

    I imagine for the price of a single 10x8 holder (mine cost about £35 each, and that was a pretty decent price for the UK) I could make half a dozen more.

    It also means that making ULF pinhole cameras a rather more manageable prospect ...

  8. #18
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pdeeh View Post
    Took me about 2 hours including tea breaks and wouldn't have taken that long had I not made a basic error of measurement and had to find a way to rescue myself from it. Or had less tea maybe.
    I'm sorry. I don't understand this bit!!


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  9. #19

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    Had I had fewer breaks for tea, it would not have taken quite so long ...

  10. #20
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Sorry. I was experimenting with humour. An Englishman cannot possibly take fewer tea breaks!


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

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