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  1. #11

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    Welcome to APUG!

    Jeff

  2. #12

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    Thank you Jaf-Photo, completely agree with you on all your points made especially the emotional impact of the analogue image.

  3. #13

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    Thanks Jeff, nice to be amongst like minded artists where I don't feel like a dinosaur.

  4. #14

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    maybe because in this instant age
    it will allow students to realize
    not everything happens instantly ?

    otherwise aside from the whole "gee wiz" factor of chemical photography
    i don't really think it leads to a greater understanding of anything ( image wise, art wise )
    they can't do with modern technology...using chemicals is time consuming and more deliberate and requires commitment

    don't get me wrong, i would rather use the black arts more than anything else
    but i don't really think chemicals are needed to created art, just imagination
    ( which is something people use film and pixels sometimes lack ..... )

    as you know from your own work, making something by hand is always worthwhile ...
    maybe hand made and not instant could be your spin ?

    good luck with your class+curriculum !

    john
    Last edited by jnanian; 05-05-2014 at 10:49 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #15
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    Traditional photography is a wonderful subject that teaches its pupils a combination of skills from a variety of fields that include the arts, sciences, and mathematics, and above all patience. If instructed in a fun and appealing manner, students will learn these basics and carry with them an understanding of how images are made and displayed to them everywhere they look. They will also experience something very few now get to experience, the joy of optical printing in the darkroom. I wish every school did have a darkroom and every student had a chance to try it once to experience it.

  6. #16

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    Maybe traditional photography needs to be transitioned out of the art department and into an applied science department.

  7. #17

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    Thanks john,
    I like that point, 'you don't need chemicals to create art, just imagination.' Yes unfortunately if you lack imagination it doesn't matter what process you use...Thanks for the good luck wishes.

  8. #18

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    Well said, totally agree Newt-on-Swings, there is nothing like the darkroom experience.

  9. #19

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    Are you mad Brian???? Ha ha ha... I wouldn't be able to teach it then, not being a scientist. But yes I see your point and it would keep it in the classroom and make science more fun and exciting.

  10. #20
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I have yet to experience anything in digital photography that approaches the experience of watching a print develop in a tray.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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