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  1. #31
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I second that magical moment of seeing your first print appear in the developer. I don't think you get the same sense of accomplishment from using a digital camera to capture an image and then printing it on an inkjet printer. Having to go through the steps of mixing chemicals, making the exposure, and developing the print gives a kid a true sense of accomplishment and investment in the activity. I taught myself the basics from a book, being a bit of an autodidact, but even so, having that eureka moment of seeing that first print, no matter how bad, materialize in the developer was what got me hooked for a lifetime. And I still get that thrill every time I make a darkroom print be it silver gelatin, platinum, cyanotype or gum.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    I second that magical moment of seeing your first print appear in the developer. I don't think you get the same sense of accomplishment from using a digital camera to capture an image and then printing it on an inkjet printer.
    +1

    Another magical moment was when I saw an image appear for the first time in the level waist finder of my first MF camera: a Bronica SQ-B - and again a few years later on my first LF camera: a russian FKD 18x24 plate camera.
    Like watching live TV (and you're the director) with all surround sound
    (I never had that experience with an lcd screen on the back of any camera)
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  3. #33
    NedL's Avatar
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    My eyes popped the first time I looked at a hasselblad finder... but even a kodak duaflex finder has some of that feeling which is lost in today's world.

  4. #34
    cliveh's Avatar
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    I would have loved to follow Fox Talbot round Lacock Abbey and watch him make his experiments and process by candle light. Perhaps it would be interesting to use candle light instead of a red safelight?

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  5. #35
    MDR
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    Analogue photography is one of the few things that merge science, humanities and art in a visible form. The darkroom is the place were this magic merger becomes visible to the uninitated who might get interested in one of the three disciplines as a result of seeing an image emerge on a white piece of paper. This is what makes photography so important it's a bridge between the different disciplines that are taught in schools and universities.

  6. #36
    Black Dog's Avatar
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    Beauty In Photography

    Quote Originally Posted by Iluvmycam View Post
    Yes, I love the critics like Sonntag that could not even take a decent photo. All talk and nothing else.
    Robert Adams could do both and he's well worth a read! Also Paul Hill.
    "He took to writing poetry and visiting the elves: and though many shook their heads and touched their foreheads and said 'Poor old Baggins!' and though few believed any of his tales, he remained very happy till the end of his days, and those were extraordinarily long "- JRR Tolkien, ' The Hobbit '.

  7. #37
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iluvmycam View Post
    Yes, I love the critics like Sonntag that could not even take a decent photo. All talk and nothing else.
    +1

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by dorff View Post
    In addition, there is great value in forcing a student to see, and express, within the confines of analogue processes. It takes away the immediacy of digital feedback, and forces a slower, more selective and deliberate process. I have heard from countless dual platform photographers how film encourages the acquisition and maintenance of good habits, that in turn then improve their discipline and results when using digital. Of course this is not universally true, and some digital-only photographers have more discipline than some film photographers.

    At least one reason for encouraging analogue processes is the inherent beauty they are capable of. While it seems perfectly logical that digital processes will eventually surpass all analogue ones in terms of hard numbers, it takes nothing away from what can be done with the analogue processes, and does not diminish their contribution for the past two centuries. At present, it is still significantly expensive and time-consuming to produce results that are on par with analogue prints. What is more, the value of hand-crafted printed images will not diminish in the sea of electronically produced and displayed imagery. Just as hand-woven, hand-knitted, hand-carved, hand-painted etc. retain their value amidst machine driven processes that dominate the mass markets.

    When encouraging analogue photography to be taught, you contribute to the demand for the materials, thereby helping to keep the remaining suppliers afloat, and helping all of us in doing so.
    ^^^^ THIS!

    Also. I have been in classes with people who have only ever know digital photography - I have found that they have a great deal of trouble understanding exposure and how to properly adjust the settings on their cameras. For some reason in my area, no one seems to teach DOF, the difference between f 1.8 and f 32, or what shutter speed should be used in which scenario. Everyone seems to think "P" = professional, and "A" = amateur... how did this happen??!! God forbid you should try to explain that going from f16 to f8 is two stops difference and you will also need to adjust your shutter accordingly... lots of blank stares from these discussions...

    Personally, I think everyone should learn exposure through the use of slide film (little room for error, and little you can do to fix it) before learning negative film and ways you can "fix" improper exposures in the darkroom (or in photoshop now days).

    I feel like digital tends to be more commercial, and analog more fine art, so for this reason, I'd say students should be exposed to both. How is someone to know about all the possibilities and processes that you can create by hand with analog that just don't transfer well to digital? A lot of the "alt process" available in analog are what make photography art. I think we can all agree that there is a totally different feel (and in my opinion, depth) to in image totally created by hand that you won't find in a digital image. To me, only teaching digital photography would be the equivalent to only allowing students in a painting class to use one brush, one type of paper, and one kind of paint. In my opinion, you can't teach any kind of art without exposing the students to multiple different techniques within the same field.

    Sorry, hope that wasn't too soapboxy, and not too off topic!
    Last edited by HeatherC; 05-17-2014 at 09:32 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #39
    Alan Klein's Avatar
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    Don't try to "prove" that film is better than digital. You'll lose because more people shoot digital and people really don't want to get into arguments about this except people here. Imagine taking an oil painting class where the instructor spends his time telling you how much it's better than watercolors. Only talk about the unique things and advantages that analog photography provides for students and the school. Good luck.

  10. #40
    PhotoBob's Avatar
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    At the University of Victoria in Art Education department I have the pleasure of occasionally teaching traditional photography to undergraduate students.
    Currently as an art teacher here in China, I really am hoping to get a modest darkroom up and running somewhere in the school.
    Film, lens and lensless photography are essential to my practice and I hope for opportunities to incorporate them into the curriculum formally and informally as each context dictates.
    Follow the Light John 8:12
    ~~~PhotoBob

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