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  1. #11

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    Matchbox camera! I think I can adapt this! Perfect. Thank you all so much. I am severe budget girl, so bags and all your other awesome ideas are, well, awesome. But I definitely need to start with as little expense as possible.
    I can do this. Superb! thank you!!!

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post

    If you want to load or develop under red light, you must use ortho film. Normal film will be fogged. I think Freestyle has some pretty cheap ortho at the moment, but it might only be sheets, I'm not sure. The drawback to ortho film is of course that red things in the scene will be rendered black, and you can't use a red/orange/yellow filter on your image to get dramatic skies. I'd suggest HP5 instead as having a really good balance of features and price.
    I am curious why you say red (safe) light is harmful to regular film? Or do you mean only in the case of pinhole photography?

  3. #13

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    "Normal" film is panchromatic and thus sensitive to red light. Try taking a strip of any old 35mm and keep it in a safelighted darkroom for a few minutes and then develop it. It'll be fogged.
    Safe lights are only safe for those materials which are insensitive to the spectrum being emitted by the light.
    Black and white photo paper and ortho film are insensitive to red and are thus ok to be handled for a short period in red light

  4. #14
    AgX
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    If one has no chance of self-processissing or even -printing than the model from my link would be the best overall choice.

    Models that produce panoramic images necessitate a lab that returns the film strip uncut. It also likely would yield problems when ordering prints.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by wilper
    http://petapixel.com/2011/10/29/35mm...pinhole-camera
    Quote Originally Posted by Arctic amateur
    Matchbox pinhole camera design
    Those two look brilliant!

    Although it's a bit of a shame the first one has taken down his instructions on how to do it, in favour of selling you a book about how to do it or selling you one he's made

    As if I don't have enough distractions already, I think I might make something similar to the matchbox version ...

  6. #16

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    I figured something else out! Maybe?

    If I use the two canisters as shown on the matchbox pinhole build ... I am thinking about sacrificing the first two? maybe ... shots ... with my camera open so I can learn how many 'turns' it will take to center the film properly. That way, I will not have a whole series of half-shots or double exposures.
    Does that make sense?

  7. #17
    AgX
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    If you use the cassette I indicated you have the backing paper that indicates proper film position, without having to bother with turns.

    With some Initial hassle you could reload the cassette with type 135 film of today. But that would necessitate a dark room (not darkroom...) or a bag.

  8. #18
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    The number of turns per frame reduces through the roll as you get more film on the takeup spool; as its diameter increases, one turn of the spool will pull more film across. Calibrating that is hard and 35mm film is pretty cheap (especially if you buy a 100 foot bulk roll) so don't worry about it. There will be bigger gaps towards the end of the film.

    In a manufactured/commercial camera, there's a little gear (or photointerrupter) which counts the sprocket holes and therefore gets even spacing. If you use 120 film (medium format), there is paper on the back with numerical markings for various different distances of winding-on.

  9. #19

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    Winding by counting the number of turns is trickier than it sounds, because there will be a fair amount of "slack" in the film that's spooled into the takeup cartride.
    The matchbox pinhole design has a "clicker" that pokes into the sprocket holes and makes a clicking sound for each hole. Measure how many sprocet holes one frame has, add one for good measure, and count the clicks when winding the film. The Populist has a similar design, and I find it works quite well. It should be easy to copy to other pinhole camera designs. Good luck!

  10. #20
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    Clicker is an excellent idea.

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