Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,871   Posts: 1,583,405   Online: 1074
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14
  1. #11
    sly
    sly is offline
    sly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Nanaimo
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,389
    Images
    227
    I don't think there's an ideal film for pinhole. It's all about personal taste. I like the perspectives and depth of field that are unique to pinhole. I often set up close to the ground. Something very close in the foreground, and interesting receding background. These are not absolutes, just keep shooting. There'll always be wasted film, that's how we learn. The more you shoot, the closer you'll get to what YOU want.

    I've got lots of pinhole (and lots of other stuff) on my website: silverlilly.zenfolio.com

    P.S. We're not all boys here.
    silverlilly.zenfolio.com

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    16
    Super fine site!
    Of course, we're not all boys around here. My bad.

  3. #13
    Jim Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rural NW Missouri
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,860
    You have two fine pinhole images. Including the edges of the film can indicate the intent of the photographer, but the viewer may be more interested in the image than in the person behind it. Those edges are distracting. The second image doesn't display a full range of tones from black to white. Printing a little darker would improve the shadows and perhaps improve the highlights. A bit more contrast may also help. Wet scanning seems unnecessary for pinhole negatives.

    Optimum pinhole diameter has been argued for well over a hundred years. My tests suggest that Pinhole Designer with a user constant of 1.4 yields the highest resolution in the center of the image. This would mean a diameter of about 0.26mm for a 62mm focal length or about 80mm distance for a 0.3mm pinhole. However, sharpness falls off towards the image edges, especially with wide angle coverage, when the diameter is optimized for center sharpness. Sometimes emphasizing sharpness near the center of the image with fuzzier edges is best, but not in your two examples. A larger pinhole gives more even sharpness over the whole image. Your pinhole diameter may be ideal for your subjects and compositions. Personal preferences are even more important in pinhole photography than in traditional methods.

    Pinhole photography has two significant advantages over lens work: great depth of field and economical wide angle coverage. Chose subjects that demand those characteristics for your pinhole work, and leave other subjects to lenses. This lets you concentrate on pinhole photography's strengths. The slight softness of pinhole images can also be used to advantage in some subjects. Remember, some photographers pay a lot of money for lenses that are designed to be slightly soft.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    16
    Thank you very much for your input.
    These are valuable and much appreciated information.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin