Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,205   Posts: 1,531,779   Online: 901
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    White Lake, Ontario.
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    342

    Pinhole and Wet Collodion?

    I know little about pinhole photography and I am curious about a possible application; that is 12x20 (or larger) wet collodion using a pinhole. Is that doable? Anyone doing such a thing here?

  2. #2
    glbeas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Roswell, Ga. USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,307
    Images
    109
    Hmm, is there a danger the wet plate may dry out before the exposure is finished?
    Gary Beasley

  3. #3
    Kerik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    California
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,465
    Images
    238
    Quote Originally Posted by glbeas
    Hmm, is there a danger the wet plate may dry out before the exposure is finished?
    I would think so. Collodion is very slow. Today I was making tins and ambros under overcast and intermittent sun. My exposures were about 20-25 sec at f/11. If you exrapolate that out to pinhole sized f/stops and throw in some time for reciprocity, you'd end up with very long exposures and very dry plates.

    Kerik
    www.kerik.com

  4. #4
    Quinn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Viernheim, Germany
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    47
    I've done several "pinplate" images (wet plate pinhole). I've done both Ambrotypes and Ferrotypes/Tintypes.

    In the winter/cooler months, I have about 15 minutes before my plate dries and I have employed some techniques that keep the plate from drying out.

    Example: http://www.collodion.com/trucks_trees.htm
    Regards,
    Quinn Jacobson
    Artist, Photographer, & Educator
    http://www.studioQ.com

  5. #5
    John Bartley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    13 Critchley Avenue, PO Box 36, Monteith Ont, P0K1P0
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,397
    Quote Originally Posted by Quinn
    I've done several "pinplate" images (wet plate pinhole). I've done both Ambrotypes and Ferrotypes/Tintypes.

    In the winter/cooler months, I have about 15 minutes before my plate dries and I have employed some techniques that keep the plate from drying out.

    Example: http://www.collodion.com/trucks_trees.htm
    Nice pinhole photo!!

    My 4x5 homemade pinhole camera has an aperture ratio of f/280 and it takes on average about 15-20 seconds to expose Ilford MGIVRC paper (iso=6) on a sunny 16 day. How does that compare to the speed of wetplates?

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    White Lake, Ontario.
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    342
    Quote Originally Posted by Quinn
    I've done several "pinplate" images (wet plate pinhole). I've done both Ambrotypes and Ferrotypes/Tintypes.

    In the winter/cooler months, I have about 15 minutes before my plate dries and I have employed some techniques that keep the plate from drying out.

    Example: http://www.collodion.com/trucks_trees.htm
    Thanks for leading me to this great resource which I din't know about.
    Much to read/learn about here, Quinn.

  7. #7
    Kerik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    California
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,465
    Images
    238
    Quote Originally Posted by Quinn
    In the winter/cooler months, I have about 15 minutes before my plate dries and I have employed some techniques that keep the plate from drying out. [/url]
    Quinn,

    Cool! What is the f/stop of your pinplate camera? Also, I'd be interested to hear about your techniques for keeping the plate from drying too quickly. Love your work, BTW!!

    Kerik

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Idaho USA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    36
    Images
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Kerik
    Quinn,

    Cool! What is the f/stop of your pinplate camera? Also, I'd be interested to hear about your techniques for keeping the plate from drying too quickly. Love your work, BTW!!

    Kerik
    Collodion dry-plates using the tannin process are not that difficult and while they would require a longer exposure time can take the long exposures required.
    I used dry-plates all winter here in Idaho when it was too cold to go out and do the normal wet-plates, and was very pleased with them, and the freedom they give to shoot anywhere including places and weather conditions regular wet plates are not possible or practical.

    You can find instructions for the basic tannin process for collodion dry-plates and the Russell modifications in the "Silver Sunbeam" http://albumen.stanford.edu/library/...am/chap37.html

    As always;

    J Truman

  9. #9
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Carolina, USA (transplanted from Seattle)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,845
    Yike! Where do you get the cadium iodide and cadmium bromide for this process?

    And are you aware of the health and environmental issues with cadium salts? They're the reason for some of the emulsion changes and product deletions at Kodak and Ilford in the last couple decades -- it was impossible to reformulate particular products without greatly altering their properties, if the cadmium used in making them was eliminated, and prohibitively costly to meet worker safety and environmental requirements if the cadmium was kept in the process.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  10. #10
    Kerik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    California
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,465
    Images
    238
    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Qualls
    Yike! Where do you get the cadium iodide and cadmium bromide for this process?

    And are you aware of the health and environmental issues with cadium salts?
    Artcraft Chemicals in NY carries these and other chemicals for the collodion process (as well as many other processes). The quantities of these salts used in the process are very small. For example, one formula that I've used contains 3 gm of cd bromide and 4 gm of potassium iodide in a final collodion solution of about 500 ml. And 500 ml of collodion goes a long way. Anyone getting into wet plate collodion should first educate themselves thoroughly on the hazards and proper handling of the chemicals involved and make judicious use of the proper personal protective equipment.

    Kerik
    www.kerik.com

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin