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  1. #1
    narsuitus's Avatar
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    Pinhole color film recommendation

    Recently, I have been experimenting with a pinhole camera. My main regret is that I did not do this experimenting back during the days when I was shooting and developing a lot of black & white film.

    My question is, which color films (slide or print) (sheet or roll) work better with pinhole cameras?

  2. #2
    PhotoPete's Avatar
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    For slides, Fuji Velvia 100 has great reciprocity characteristics. It's available in roll or sheet. http://www.fujifilm.com/JSP/fuji/epa...n/AF3-202E.pdf

  3. #3
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    If you prefer C-41 (or have a lab that can do it locally, but not the same for E-6), you might also look at Fuji Superia 100. From my reading, it needs no reciprocity correction out to 120 seconds -- which will cover a lot of interiors and practically all daylight situations, even at ISO 100. Best of all, Superia has the latitude of negative film -- more of your exposures will make good final images.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  4. #4
    PhotoPete's Avatar
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    Actually, the Fuji Provia is better than the Velvia, but the exposure latitude is smaller for sure with E-6. The right lightmeter will go a long way to making you happy with your pinhole slides. What format will you be shooting?

  5. #5
    narsuitus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhotoPete
    What format will you be shooting?
    I am using an Argus C3 that I converted to a pinhole camera. If I don't get the results I like in 35mm, I will convert a 120 camera or build a large format sheet film pinhole camera.

    I just tried the Fuji Provia and like the way it handles long exposures. However, I don't like having to bracket like crazy to get a decent exposure. If I go with the 4x5 or 8x10 inch sheet film format, I cannot afford to bracket as much as I do with 35mm.

    Next I will try the Fuji Superia 100. Hopefully, the wider exposure latitude of this color print film will allow me to shoot without so much bracketing.

  6. #6

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    Whatever you take, my advice is use print film, as it can handle much more contrast, and has a much larger exposure latitude than slide film. And, I would use a 400 ASA film.

  7. #7

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    With pinhole color the trick is to use a contrasty film, because pinholes naturally produce a low-contast result.

  8. #8
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    That depends on the camera, Poptart. I've got one, a converted Balda Baldixette (retracting lens 6x6 on 120) that, due to a combination of factors affecting pinhole placement inside the camera, acts as if it has both a lens hood and an internal baffle to capture stray light; I get images that look just like those from a lens camera except for the pinhole "almost sharp" and near-infinite DOF.

    I'll attach an example...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 10.jpg  
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Poptart
    With pinhole color the trick is to use a contrasty film, because pinholes naturally produce a low-contast result.
    To the best of my knowledge, this is wrong. Much depends on the camera construction, of course, but the long exposures alone often necessitate reduced development. And, contrasty films tend to have less exposure latitude.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lukas Werth
    To the best of my knowledge, this is wrong. Much depends on the camera construction, of course, but the long exposures alone often necessitate reduced development. And, contrasty films tend to have less exposure latitude.
    I have found that pinhole negatives tend to be far lower in contrast than lens- photograph negatives. I usually give my b&w pinhole negatives N+1 development just to give them some zip. (N+1 as tested for my lens-camera development time). This includes negatives exposed for as long as two weeks in very low levels of light. High-contrast scenes I usually give normal development instead of N-1. My usual pinhole film is Tri-X, in 4x5 and 8x10.

    I have used both normal and higher contrast color negative films in my pinhole cameras and prefer the higher contrast film. The diffraction inherent in pinhole images just makes for a flatter image. In bright sun with heavy shadows, though, I probably would choose a normal contrast film.

    Peter Gomena

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