Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,327   Posts: 1,536,984   Online: 1213
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 15 of 15
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Suburban Detroit, Michigan, USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    12
    I made a couple of pinholes for an old crown graphic. The only trouble is that at the shortest focal lengths the camera focus bed is in the photo, even if it's in the dropped position.
    Bill

  2. #12
    Mongo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    960
    If you're willing to fork over the money, a Bronica S2/S2a is probably the best body ever made for lens hacking like this. (6x6 on 120, by the way, with a waist level finder, bulb, and easy to remove lenses...it meets your criteria well.)

    The best thing about the early Bronicas is the lens mounting system. Most of the lenses went into the bayonet on the focusing helicoil, which was then mounted on the camera. Some lenses mounted directly to the bayonet on the body. You have three places to mount a lens on one of these bodies. The body has a bayonet mount. The helicoil has a bayonet mount. And the helicoil also has threads just outside of the bayonet mount (57x1mm...not the most common threads, but any competent machine shop can help you out if you want to get fancy). For a pinhole, you can just remove the whole lens and helicoil and tape the pinhole over the opening in the body. With very little work, you can mount just about anything on the body...enlarger lenses, LF lenses, loupes, whatever else you care to try. Since the camera has a focal plane shutter, you don't need shutters in your lenses. I've had a blast over the years, attaching various things to the front of my S2a. And when I'm done, I mount up the Nikkor lenses that were made for the camera and get amazingly sharp pictures.

    This wouldn't be your cheapest solution, but it definately gives you a body that's great for experimenting with, and that takes great photographs with the lenses that were made for it.

    Best of luck.
    Dave
    Film is cheap. Opportunities are priceless.

  3. #13
    Anupam Basu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    504
    Images
    20
    Thanks for all the suggestions. I'll look into some of the folders. However, I don't think I want a 6x6 SLR right now for two reasons - the viewfinder might get too dark if my "lens" is about f256 wide open. Secondly, I am making do with a TLR now, but I know I'll end up spending way more than I can afford on MF lenses once I get a body

    -A

  4. #14
    derevaun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Oly, WA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    67
    What about a Holga? They're easy to take apart and it's easy to seal up the famous light leaks. The 120n has a bulb shutter; you can just unscrew the lens, tape the pinhole in place, and you're done (after a couple spots of tape for the lightleaks). Its main drawback is that it doesn't take a cable release (a wire nut and some glue fixes that).

  5. #15
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Carolina, USA (transplanted from Seattle)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,845
    For 6x6, I'd suggest looking at the broad range of pseudo-TLR consumer cameras made by companies other than Kodak. Most had simple rotary shutters that are easy to convert to B-only (or even T-only, by removing the return spring from the shutter release arm), the lenses are simple meniscus that's easily removed and replaced with a pinhole, and it's usually possible, with a little effort, to find a location for the pinhole that won't vignette. I have a Spartus Full-Vue that took me about half an hour to convert, most of that spent figuring out how to remove the lens without damaging the very thin aluminum front plate; it's native 120 and works well.

    Waist level finders aside, a Dacora Digna is another name, a camera that's the size and shape of a Holga and can likely be had for $5 on eBay. The retracting lens Baldixette works pretty well, but it's a little tricky to install the pinhole to avoid vignetting (OTOH, it has an internal baffle that *really* cuts down on flare -- it's now my #1 6x6 pinhole camera). An Agfa Click would work well, and surprisingly the bellows on a Speedex Jr. are usually okay, even though newer and "better" Ansco folders typically have the plastic coated bellows that are virtually guaranteed to leak; as a bonus, the lens glass (double meniscus) is easily removed, and easily reinstalled later if you choose (the two elements are identical, so interchangeable); the camera has a tripod mount and cable release socket, and the shutter has a true T (press once to open, again to close). The pinhole can go on the back of the aperture; conversion ought to take no more than an hour, possibly less than half that.

    Of that lot, I'd suggest the Speedex Jr. if you can get one for less than $10 or so. The ability to fold the camera and put it in a pocket, even after conversion, is priceless...
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin