Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,968   Posts: 1,558,474   Online: 1023
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26
  1. #1
    JBrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    6,781

    Source for stainless steel.

    If I was going to micro drill stainless steel to make a pinhole, what thickness should I use, and where could I source it? So far locally I have found .010 in 430, but I think it is still a little thick. Recomendations?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,512
    Images
    4
    Try MSC Supply or McMaster-Carr. Both carry a pretty good variety.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  3. #3
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,214
    Images
    65
    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner View Post
    If I was going to micro drill stainless steel to make a pinhole, what thickness should I use, and where could I source it? So far locally I have found .010 in 430, but I think it is still a little thick. Recomendations?
    Sheet stainless is made with a pinhole opening for several purposes. Tom Miller runs a pinhole web site with information on these sheets which come in packages which contain several of them. I believe that they are finer than f90 and work very well in pinhole cameras.

    I don't have his current URL or e-mail, but a google search should help.

    He has also taught at the Formulary and they would probably put you in touch with him.

    PE

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,512
    Images
    4
    I have used brass shim stock at .001 thickness. IIRC the folks who sell pre-drilled pinholes for various focal lengths use .001 stainless. I doubt the stainless alloy would make difference with material that thin.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  5. #5
    JBrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    6,781
    I will look him up, and check out the companies recommended as well. Thanks guys. To clarify what I'm doing, I know I could buy them, or laser drilled brass, etc., but my intention is to fabricate every part of this camera that I can reasonably make by myself. The camera will be an 8x10.
    Last edited by JBrunner; 10-30-2007 at 12:26 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: cant spell for $#!t

  6. #6
    JBrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    6,781
    A quick peruse shows shim stock as the likely candidate. Any reason to choose brass over stainless or vice versa? (cost aside)

  7. #7

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    775
    http://www.smallparts.com has both stainless and brass shim stock in 0.001 thick.

    I have used the the stainless for a pin hole and with a highspeed (dremel at 30,000 rpm) drill it seemed to make a nice round hole. Small parts also has the tiny number drills that you may need to make the hole.

    At the price of a single sheet of each, I would suggest buying a sheet of each and see which one you like best. The Stainless may give the best hole, but I am not certain.

  8. #8
    greybeard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Northern California
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    377
    Images
    6
    This is probably well-known in the world of pinhole experts, but then again, maybe not; I found it in a 1930s Kodak book: use a blunt point such as a carpet needle or rounded center punch to make a dimple, supporting the stock on a piece of wood and tapping the needle gently. Then use a sanding block to gently thin the opposite side of the dimple until a hole is created that is round and of the proper diameter. Having tried it, I can say that it works just fine with brass shim stock, and also with aluminum from a soft drink can.

    One advantage over a drilled hole is that the edges of the opening are knife-edged, which is theoretically better than a short cylinder. Also, there will be no burrs, as often occur unless the stock is sandwiched tightly between heavier material before drilling.

  9. #9
    JBrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    6,781
    Quote Originally Posted by greybeard View Post
    This is probably well-known in the world of pinhole experts, but then again, maybe not; I found it in a 1930s Kodak book: use a blunt point such as a carpet needle or rounded center punch to make a dimple, supporting the stock on a piece of wood and tapping the needle gently. Then use a sanding block to gently thin the opposite side of the dimple until a hole is created that is round and of the proper diameter. Having tried it, I can say that it works just fine with brass shim stock, and also with aluminum from a soft drink can.

    One advantage over a drilled hole is that the edges of the opening are knife-edged, which is theoretically better than a short cylinder. Also, there will be no burrs, as often occur unless the stock is sandwiched tightly between heavier material before drilling.
    Interesting, thanks for bringing it up. The stainless may be too hard, but I will try it with brass as well.

  10. #10
    DBP
    DBP is offline

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Alexandria, VA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,885
    Images
    34
    You might also consider the varieties of aluminum sheet sold at art and hobby shops.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin