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  1. #1

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    interested in pin hole

    for some reason i'm finding pin hole to be interesting, even though I never shot pin hole camera before or where to begin at. I like to do it, but it comes to film because i use 35mm slr. so can the 35mm film cartridge be use or what.

    any and all info that can be provided would be greatly appriecated.

  2. #2
    keithwms's Avatar
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    For pinhole, you'll quickly see that you want to use the largest format that is convenient for you, so that you can minimize your enlargement factor when printing.

    But sure, you can get a body cap for your 35mm, drill a hole in it, tape a copper plate with a pinhole over that, and off you go. Easy. This will interest you enough to consider trying it in larger formats! Then you might consider adapting a holga to pinhole or whatever.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  3. #3

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    When I grow up, I want to be a photographer.

    http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Photography/index.html

  4. #4

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    k thanxs I'll pick up another body cap for my EOS 3. what size hole, because I do have micro drill bits that goes from .038 to .0135 and a pin vise to hold them in, from a past hobby of mine.

  5. #5
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    I make 35mm pinhole cameras with little matchboxes. I got the idea from an issue of the UK's black and white photography last year.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  6. #6
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SiNiStEr NaTiOn View Post
    k thanxs I'll pick up another body cap for my EOS 3. what size hole, because I do have micro drill bits that goes from .038 to .0135 and a pin vise to hold them in, from a past hobby of mine.
    Perhaps the best calculator for optimum pinhole diameter is http://www.pinhole.cz/en/pinholedesigner/. A site dedicated to pinhole photography is http://www.f295.org/Pinholeforum/forum/Blah.pl?. You'll find many examples of pinhole photographs and cameras there, and friendly people who can answer almost any pinhole question.

  7. #7
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    The only thing you'll need to know to determine your drill bit size is your 'focal' length. From the pinhole to the film plane.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  8. #8

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    Plenty of laser drilled holes on Ebay, with the diameters noted. Making your own and going through the enlarger projections and algebra is rewarding, but time consuming.

    Agree with the above, the largest format film is best, even if you can only contact it. Keep your eye out for a light-tight box, ready-made, that saves a lot of time. I found that the old 50 caliber vietnam era ammo boxes are perfect. Light tight, air and water tight, indestructable, cheap, and you can get two 4X5 sheets in the box if you divide it in half. Probably can't take them on an airplane though.

  9. #9
    Joe VanCleave's Avatar
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    Craft Boxes at Hobby Lobby

    I'll put a plug in for the photo/video storage boxes sold at Hobby Lobby. They have a line of boxes covered in felt, where the felt covering on the lid wraps around, making a good light-tight box with no modification.

    I spray painted the inside flat black, cut a 1" square hole in the lid for the pinhole foil, added a rotating shutter cut from a scrap of masonite, using a simple bolt and nylock nut, and it makes great wide-angle photos. You have to cut down the 8x10 paper to 7.5x10 to fit inside flat without bending it.

    $5 per box. Cheap at any price.

    With an optimal sized pinhole, contact prints from these simple box cameras are remarkable. See here for a humble example.

    ~Joe
    Last edited by Joe VanCleave; 04-02-2008 at 04:56 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #10
    Murray@uptowngallery's Avatar
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    I usually use a 0.25 mm one for a 35 mm camera if I have a spare.

    I rarely print my pinhole images...I usually keep them on the web. Since they are usually viewed at 96 dpi via SVGA, I 'overscan' then, or even get your color film processed & scanned to CD, which will porobably automatically be at least 300 dpi (400 last time I had one done). Then you have the ability to see them larger on screen. I was unhappy with the amount of blur in 35mm 4x6 prints from 35mm pinhole, but some people learn to use the blur to advantage and shoot compositions enhanced by the softness, rather than shooting normal camera compositions & thinking they are too blurry.

    I found a couple obvious advantages and one obvious disadvantage to the 35mm body cap method. The advantage is that you can use the camera's viewfinder with a 50 mm lens first for composition and metering, knowing you will have a good idea of what you will see on print/film. Another advantage is that at the standard body cap spacing (it was 41 mm on a couple I did), you have very even illumination across the negative.

    The disadvantage was also due to having the pinhole distance nearly the same as the lens - all my landscapes looked like blurry conventional photography.

    By building a box camera or converting a folder to give a wide angle camera, you can get results that look alot different than ordinary.

    If you convert a folder with its foldout geometry, same thing, you'll have normal perspective. The alternative way to convert a folder, particularly one with a bad bellows, is to remove the lens, cover the folded bellows in-polace with something light tight, and get a very wide angle camera. Of course, this requires a hole in the folding bed. This method I personally recommend only for a folder in poor, unrepairable condition...

    The 120 versions of Kodak 1A, 2A etc are good for this, as the bellows are usually shot, and the Ball Bearing Shutters may or may not be usable. On the 2-element lens ones, you can easily unscrew the lens elements and if lucky, use the T or B shutter mode for long expsoures.

    I also got one from someone that simply had a piece of luan or similar glued over the front with the lens and bellow removed, and a 1" hole drilled in the wood. This is about 25mm on a 6x9 negative, very wide angle.

    With wide and very wide angle cameras, you can never got close enough to your subject...you will be surprised by how far away for are even after you told yourself to get closer.

    Where pinhole really shines in my opinion is in wide angle, near-ground perspectives and macro. The lack of resolution is less objectionable on close-up subject matter, the DOF even with the reduced resolution will counter the frustration of getting adequate DOF with a lens in macro work.

    Landscapes where the details are at the horizon will lose much detail because pinhole cannot resolve very small items as well as large non-detailed shapes.

    Lastly, if you do venture to one of the online pinhole calculators, I suggest you use a lower pinhole constant (1.5-1.56 vs Rayleigh's 1.9), or simply reduce the calculated 'optimal' hole diameter by about 22% (multiply by 0.78)...that's my preference.

    Have fun.

    Even if you just do a body cap on a 35mm camera, try to think 'out of the box' and shoot things you wouldn't normally shoot with a lens - do what pinhole works best on and not try to think like you do with a 50 mm lens on the camera. Macro works well with a pinhole-converted normal perspective (that 40-46 mm spacing, if you can figure out where you're aiming. (The unknown might be part of the fun for some people).

    You can see SOME things thru the SLR eyepiece, but only bright things.

    Also remember that the eyepiece can let light into the film thru the pentaprism if you are shooting vertically at the ground on a tripod with the sun above you. Normally not a significant issue with short lens/shutter exposures, but with longer pinhole exposures, this can happen.

    Visit f295.org also.

    Murray
    Murray



 

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