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  1. #11

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    I really don't think you need to worry about FL. The pinhole will take care of DOF. You can experiment with droplet size and how it affects FL (view angle).

  2. #12

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    I just had another thought. Since the refractive index of clear liquids differ the same size drop made of different liquids sould differ in focal legnth. It's like a lens with regular glass of HRI glass. I have a pinhole cap for my SLR. I may try this out with different liquids and see what I get.

  3. #13
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Maybe make your micro-sphere lens with a drop of clear glue that will harden in the right shape.

    You can also get a very small plano-convex glass lens - the shape of an ideal water drop on a window pain - the usual source of overpriced lenses is http://www.edmundoptics.com/ , or you can make your own http://www.alanmacfarlane.com/glass/birm4.html, you can also take the lens out of a busted CD player.

    If you want to make a 'water-drop' spherical lens you might try Making a Van Leeuwenhoek Microscope Lens.

    Realize when you do this you will have a focal length of only a few mm.

    A fish-eye pinhole is a contradiction in terms, as a pinhole lens is rectilinear and a fish-eye is anything but.

    Door peep-hole viewers are another common DIY fish-eye adapter.

    Or you could use the eye of a fish ...
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  4. #14

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    Nicholas... good ideas.

  5. #15

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    Thanks, guys. I had not looked for a few days and now I have a bunch of ideas for a) finding a higher than water surface tension clea liquid an b) a syringe to apply a smaaaaaall droplet. Fun to think about how to make this happen.

    In fact, a few years ago I stayed in a room during a wild storm and the window was dotted with little water halfballs. I shot through them and found small fisheye images on the film. I should have moved the lens closer for large fisheye images. So now i want to recreate this with pinholes, ca. 90 degree of view. Good luck to me and thanks to you!

  6. #16
    Krzys's Avatar
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    Why not place your pinhole camera so it is flat on the ground and looking directly towards the sky. Then place a drop of water over the pinhole. I assume it will stay in its place over the pinhole due to surface tension. Ideally I'd try this in the city with skyscrapers in frame. The fish-eye effect will be neat in this setting.

    All just thoughts as I have no experience with pinholes.

  7. #17

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    There was experiments upon the subject few decades ago.
    look for what Jim Jones said there:
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum62/5...milestone.html

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