Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,506   Posts: 1,543,493   Online: 1048
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 27
  1. #11
    aaronmichael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    242
    Quote Originally Posted by SMBooth View Post
    My early trys at Ortho Lith was its really slow, as other have said ISO3 but suffers badly from reciprocity making pinhole exposure really loooong. I was rating it ISO1 in bright day light with a f333 pinhole (200mm 8x10) and was still under exposing. The 3rd and 4th images under "resent" in the pinhole link below are Ortho Lith (Arista ll)
    Those couple of images look great. What I really wanted to know from this post was if a decent continuous tone could be achieved from the ortho litho film and it seems it can. What kind of developer did you use?

    I think my aperture is somewhere around 280 - 300 but I'm not exactly sure. On a sunny day (but in shaded areas (to avoid too much contrast)) I was getting exposure times of 5-7 minutes.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    57
    When I tried for continuous tone with the APHS, I would use some of the schools HC110 Dil B, dilute it even more in a tray (to make something close to Dilution H) and develop by inspection in the darkroom.

  3. #13
    SMBooth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Melbourne, North/West
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    991
    Images
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by aaronmichael View Post
    Those couple of images look great. What I really wanted to know from this post was if a decent continuous tone could be achieved from the ortho litho film and it seems it can. What kind of developer did you use?

    I think my aperture is somewhere around 280 - 300 but I'm not exactly sure. On a sunny day (but in shaded areas (to avoid too much contrast)) I was getting exposure times of 5-7 minutes.
    I got a feeling that those images were around 10min, but like said still under exposed. They were developed using Jim Galli's Rodinal+restrainer soup.
    http://tonopahpictures.0catch.com/Fr...SwRodinal.html

  4. #14
    aaronmichael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    242
    Thanks for the responses. I think I'll start off with basic diluted paper or film developer and then if I need to switch to some kind of concoction or a Rodinal mixture, I can. If I buy the 50 pack, I'll have lots of negatives to experiment with. I have a feeling that it will take me a while to go through that many shots, figuring as one completed pinhole photo takes 30-45 minutes. Setting up, shooting, and developing add up quick.

    One more question - I've only ever worked with developing black and white 35mm (what we were shooting for class). When I purchase the ortho litho film, how do I treat in regards to developing? Would I use the stop bath, fixer, hypo-clear, and photo-flo that I used for developing 35mm? Or would I use the stop and fix that's in the darkroom that I use for paper developing? Sorry for the newbie question.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Pasadena, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    813
    Images
    9
    Google for Dave Soemarko's LC-1 formula...great contrast control for APHS film. Invaluable for making a low contrast interpos and then using another dilution or time for making the final interneg.

  6. #16
    SMBooth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Melbourne, North/West
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    991
    Images
    7
    Develop, Stop, Fix and wash. Use some photoflo in final rinse before hanging to dry. My stop and fix for film is the same as paper... Don't bother about hypo clear

  7. #17
    aaronmichael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    242
    Quote Originally Posted by PVia View Post
    Google for Dave Soemarko's LC-1 formula...great contrast control for APHS film. Invaluable for making a low contrast interpos and then using another dilution or time for making the final interneg.
    Unfortunately I don't have the knowledge or resources to be mixing my own formulas. I'll start experimenting with all that stuff in my later courses. I took Intro to Photography class this semester and will be taking Intermediate Photography next semester.

    Quote Originally Posted by SMBooth
    Develop, Stop, Fix and wash. Use some photoflo in final rinse before hanging to dry. My stop and fix for film is the same as paper... Don't bother about hypo clear
    Thanks for the information, appreciate it.

  8. #18
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,375
    Images
    60
    When it comes to fixer, most use the same fixer for film and paper, although many use different dilutions (with film fixer being more concentrated).

    If you re-use fixer, you shouldn't fix paper in fixer that has previously been used for film (and vice-versa).

    I may be the only person I know who uses different stop bath for film and fixer - Kodak for film, and Ilford for paper. I do that because once diluted to working strength Kodak stop bath (acetic acid) is considerably cheaper, but Ilford stop bath (citric acid) smells much better .
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #19
    aaronmichael's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    242
    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    When it comes to fixer, most use the same fixer for film and paper, although many use different dilutions (with film fixer being more concentrated).

    If you re-use fixer, you shouldn't fix paper in fixer that has previously been used for film (and vice-versa).

    I may be the only person I know who uses different stop bath for film and fixer - Kodak for film, and Ilford for paper. I do that because once diluted to working strength Kodak stop bath (acetic acid) is considerably cheaper, but Ilford stop bath (citric acid) smells much better .
    I know what you mean about the smells - my hands always smelled horrible after coming out of the darkroom at school. Thanks for the tip about the fixer. I'd just have to go out of the darkroom for a second to put some film fixer into a tray - that's easy enough. I don't think I'll bother using different stop baths - I'll just use what they have there for film. So all in all, I'll be using either a diluted paper or film developer, film stop, and film fix - got it.

  10. #20
    Joe VanCleave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    Shooter
    Pinhole
    Posts
    484
    You may want to know that when handling APHS film under red lights, it's hard to tell which side of the film is the emulsion side, since the sheets don't have notch codes in the corners like with "real" sheet film. I've found that the emulsion side looks less reflective, more dull gray, than does the non-coated side. If you are cutting APHS down to smaller sizes, it'd be a good idea to make your own notch codes to help you keep track.

    My experience with exposing APHS in pinhole cameras is that, unlike with paper negatives, there's a significant reciprocity failure, such that I've found a working Exposure Index of less than 2 is more realistic in day lit scenes. This film is so slow with pinhole cameras that I find it less than desirable, as compared to paper negatives, unless enlarging the negatives is an absolute must. For my purposes, I've found making larger format pinhole cameras (like 8x10) and contact printing the resulting larger paper negatives to be a more satisfying experience for me. YMMV.

    As a comparison, I've found that with using Freestyle's Arista grade 2 RC paper as a negative, I can rate the paper at ISO12 in pinhole cameras and also glass-lensed cameras, exposed directly from a light meter's reading with no reciprocity correction, and develop it in 68f Ilford Universal Paper developer diluted 1:15, and get great negatives. Oh, I also preflash these paper negatives. As a comparison, I'd have to rate APHS at an exposure index of less than 2 (sometimes less than 1, depending on the camera's focal ratio; the higher the f-stop, the more correction required), which gives really unpractically long exposure times. Many times the paper negative images look sharper because there's less time spend on the tripod in a lengthy exposure, where the tripod legs can slowly settle into the soft terrain, or the wind can vibrate the camera excessively. These are all tradeoffs between needing to enlarge film negatives and learning to live with contact printing paper negatives.

    I'm surprised no one else has mentioned the problems with pinholes when developing APHS. I've thought for a while that it was caused just by the change from alkaline developer to acidic stop bath, and went with using a water stop instead, but still got pinholes in the film. Then I went with ensuring the three baths were more consistent in temperature, along with a water stop bath, and the problem seems to be less evident, although it still happens occasionally.

    If using an inexpensive sheet film were on the top of my list, I'd be looking to try some of the X-ray films available, rather than APHS. I know there's an extensive thread on this subject somewhere here on APUG.

    ~Joe
    Last edited by Joe VanCleave; 12-19-2010 at 10:57 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: clarification

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin